Different Needs, Common Ground

Miriam’s Vision is about building an inclusive, non-violent society, respecting fundamental rights. This cannot be over-emphasised to students, whenever the opportunity arises.
 

Practicalities

The Miriam's Vision Citizenship Module consists of a set of lesson plans in the form of guided instructions. Resources (electronic and otherwise) are listed at the beginning of each lesson plan and highlighted within the plans for ease of reference. You have everything you need on this website to deliver Miriam's Vision in your classroom.
 

For ease of reference, we will often refer to the 2005 London bombings as "7/7"On 7th July, 2005 four suicide bombers coordinated attacks on the London transport system. 52 people were killed and estimated 700 injured..

The four-part Miriam’s Story video package (total 8 minutes) is embedded in all of the Miriam's Vision Schemes of Work. This sets essential context and is built into this module in stages.

The Miriam’s Vision Citizenship Scheme of Work may be preceded by the Miriam’s Vision PSHE module (two to three sessions, depending on length). You may choose to focus on one or other curriculum area, or teach both together. However, the first PSHE session (about Miriam and 7/7) does help to provide context for the Citizenship module, which moves from personal response to inevitable adversity, to the political.

The module subtitle, Different Needs, Common Ground, refers to the balance that must be achieved between different interested parties in the areas of human rights and democratic process.

Module overview

Sessions one and two introduce the Human Rights Act and ask students to think about how we should protect human rights in an age of extremism. In this sense, it moves from the personal to the political, with more of a citizenship focus.

Sessions three to five concern democratic change. Students consider how to make change in ways that are non-violent, democratic and respect the rights of others. These ideas are developed through a case study of campaigns for and against a third runway at Heathrow airport. The case study has been chosen to illustrate the diversity of tactics to make change, and emphasises the need to build alliances with others.

Session six requires the group to generate a topic that is of interest to them (personal or local to the school or its area) and apply principles they have explored in the previous sessions to a role-play debate.

The plans are guides only. They do not include timings for example, as we know you will wish to adapt and select according to the needs of your class.  The materials are designed to be as flexible as possible so, for example, depending on your timetabling you may wish to split the module between the human rights sessions and the democratic process ones.  We have assumed sessions of about an hour – any less and you may need to modify the plans or extend the enquiry over more sessions.  We have not included suggestions about differentiation but could refine the plans according to your feedback on this.

Finally, you will need to be aware of possible sensitivities around this topic.  Some students may have been directly or indirectly affected themselves and there are potential religious sensitivities.

Please allow 10 minutes at the end of the session for students to complete the Student Survey. Please collect the surveys at the end and submit them to the MHMT. If you are participating in our Evaluation & Impact Study this is vital. Thank you.

National Curriculum requirements covered

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-citizenship-programmes-of-study/national-curriculum-in-england-citizenship-programmes-of-study-for-key-stages-3-and-4

Purpose of study

A high-quality citizenship education helps to provide pupils with knowledge, skills and understanding to prepare them to play a full and active part in society. In particular, citizenship education should foster pupils’ keen awareness and understanding of democracy [and] government... Teaching should equip pupils with the skills and knowledge to explore political and social issues critically, to weigh evidence, debate and make reasoned arguments. It should also prepare pupils to take their place in society as responsible citizens.

Aims

Pupils

  • acquire a sound knowledge and understanding of how the United Kingdom is governed, its political system and how citizens participate actively in its democratic systems of government
  • develop a sound knowledge and understanding of the rule of law and the justice system in our society and how laws are shaped and enforced
  • develop an interest in, and commitment to, participation in volunteering as well as other forms of responsible activity, that they will take with them into adulthood
  • are equipped with the skills to think critically and debate political questions.

Key Stage 3

Teaching should develop pupils’ understanding of democracy, government and the rights and responsibilities of citizens. Pupils should use and apply their knowledge and understanding while developing skills to research and interrogate evidence, debate and evaluate viewpoints, present reasoned arguments and take informed action.

Pupils should be taught about

  • the development of the political system of democratic government in the United Kingdom, including the roles of citizens [and] Parliament.
  • the precious liberties enjoyed by the citizens of the United Kingdom
  • the nature of rules and laws and the justice system, including the role of the police and the operation of courts and tribunals
  • the roles played by public institutions and voluntary groups in society, and the ways in which citizens work together to improve their communities (including opportunities to participate in school-based activities)
Resources Downloads: 
Different Needs, Common Ground

Session 1: Human rights: What are they, and how can they be protected?

Citizenship
Citizenship
Focus: 
  • Different Needs, Common Ground
  • Human rights: What are they, and how can they be protected?
  • Exploring the Human Rights Act as a framework for living in a safe and equitable society
Key Message: 
  • As citizens of the UK, we all have certain rights that are currently written into law in the Human Rights Act (1998). It is important to protect human rights, but it is not always easy to do so; sometimes rights can conflict, and it can be difficult to find a balance between different rights.
  • Protecting rights is everyone’s responsibility.
Objectives: 
  • Students will explore the Human Rights Act and the different kinds of rights that it protects
  • Students will consider cases where rights can conflict, and use their own judgement to weigh up competing rights
Outcomes: 
  • Students will distinguish between different kinds of rights that are protected in the HRA
  • In the role of “judges”, students will consider seven cases and in each case identify and balance the rights involved
  • Students will explore how responsibilities are connected to rights
Links to National Curriculum: 

In this session, students debate and evaluate viewpoints and present reasoned arguments. They consider the precious liberties enjoyed by citizens of the United Kingdom and touch upon the nature of rules and laws in the justice system.

Plan: 

Starter: Miriam’s Story

  • Show Miriam's Story videos 1 to 4 of 4 (unless you have preceded the Citizenship module with the “Miriam’s Vision” PSHE module) and recap the content of the videos. MV Resource 0 Info for Students.pdf is a single page summary of Miriam's Vision and its aims. Print and distribute a copy to each student.
  • Assign each student a number from one to five and have them sit in groups with others with the same number. Then project Slides 1 and 2 of MV Citizenship Resource 1.1 Intro to Human Rights and ask them to imagine they are one of the following, depending on their number:

1. A family member of someone who was killed in the 7/7 bombings

2. A police officer

3. A commuter who takes the tube to work every day

4. A Londoner of Asian appearance

5. The Mayor of London

  • As per the slide, tell students that it is 07 August 2005, a month after the bombings. Ask them how they feel, what they fear, and what they think should happen next.  You may want to give them a few minutes to discuss it in the groups they share a number with, in character, before feeding back to the whole class.
  • This activity could throw up lots of different thoughts and feelings. If necessary, take time to discuss these with students.  The purpose is that they understand some of the conflicting pressures that followed the events. You might want to discuss the concerns of police to prevent future attacks, or fears in the Muslim community about increased Islamophobia, in the media and elsewhere. You could also highlight how different people in similar situations might develop very different responses.

 

Phase 1: Introducing rights

  • Explain to students that in today’s session they will be learning about rights. Ask them which of the five people on Slide 2 have rights. The answer is all of them.  Suggest to students that rights were not respected on 7/7, but that thinking about rights is a good way to make sure everyone is treated fairly in the way we respond to an event like this.
  • Students may already have some familiarity with the concept of rights. In pairs or groups, ask them to write their own definition.  They may find the words on Slide 3 useful to help them.
  • Show Slide 4 about the Human Rights Act, 1998. This protects the European Convention of Human Rights by UK law, and lists all the rights that we legally have as citizens of the UK. If students have previously studied the UN Declaration on Human Rights, you may wish to contrast the two documents.  The main distinction between the UN Declaration and the Human Rights Act is that the HRA is UK law.
  • Give each student an A4 copy of MV Citizenship Resource 1.1 Intro to Human Rights. Read it through and discuss any unclear terms. Then show Slide 5 and ask students to highlight which rights concern crime and punishment, and which concern politics and making change. Link back to 7/7 by asking them to identify which rights were not respected on that day. There is also a thinking question on the Slide 5 as an extension for G&T students: “Can you think of any situations where our rights should be limited?”
  • Show Slide 6 and explain that some rights are absolute while others can sometimes be limited. Ask students to guess which of the rights are considered to be absolute. Slide 7: There are four: Article 2 (right to life), Article 3 (protection from torture), Article 4 (protection from slavery) and Article 7 (no punishment without law).

Phase 2: Human rights case studies

  • Show Slides 8 to 11 and ask students to imagine that they are judges. They must consider seven cases, on Slides 12 to 18, reproduced in MV Citizenship Resource 1.5 Human Rights case studies as a .pdf, relating to human rights. In each case, they must decide:
  1. Which rights are involved
  2. What they think should happen
  • There are several ways of organizing this activity. Each case could be discussed collectively as whole class. Alternatively, you could divide the class into seven groups and give each group a print-out of each case from MV Citizenship Resource 1.5 Human Rights case studies to consider. The groups pass the print-outs around, so that each group sees all the cases, or they could feedback orally to students from other groups. Students can make notes individually or as a group on A4 copies of MV Citizenship Resource 1.3 You Be the Judge student sheet.

The seven cases are all based on real situations, which have been simplified for the purposes of this resource. An interesting extension (e.g. for G&T students) may be to read some articles about the real-world cases. The cases are:

1. “Fabrice Muamba: racist Twitter user jailed for 56 days” http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-17515992

2. “UK prisoners denied the vote should not be given compensation, ECHR rules” http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2014/aug/12/uk-prisoners-denied-vote-no-compensation-european-court-of-human-rights

3. “Gay snub Cornish B&B owners lose Supreme Court appeal” http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-25119158

4. “Blair pushes for 90 day detention” http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/6153488.stm

5. “RAF Fairford protesters win legal battle against police” http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-gloucestershire-21382889

6. “Article 3: No torture, inhuman or degrading treatment” https://www.liberty-human-rights.org.uk/human-rights/what-are-human-rights/human-rights-act/article-3-no-torture-inhuman-or-degrading

7. “Liberty wins landmark stop and search case in court of human rights” https://www.liberty-human-rights.org.uk/news/press-releases/liberty-wins-landmark-stop-and-search-case-court-human-rights

  • Get feedback from the students about their thoughts. As they are feeding back, you might want to tell them about the outcomes of the actual cases.  More information is on MV Citizenship Resource 1.4 You Be the Judge teacher sheet. Do they think the outcomes are fair? Why / why not?

Plenary 2:  Conclusion

  • Show Slide 19 and discuss the statement: “There are no rights without responsibilities.” What does it mean? Do they agree?
  • Show Slide 20 and return to the five characters from the start of the session. How might they be affected by human rights? e.g. the police officer will have to consider human rights when dealing with criminals and suspects

Homework?

You may ask students to research one of the case studies in more detail online, or to find out about their own example of when the Human Rights Act has been used.

Session 2: Human rights: Balancing rights and responsibilities

Citizenship
Citizenship
Focus: 
  • Different Needs, Common Ground
  • Human rights: Balancing rights and responsibilities
  • Should the government be allowed to track your emails and phone calls?
Key Message: 

Balancing rights can be difficult. There have been lots of debates recently about the right to privacy, in particular how much power the government should have to monitor our phone calls and emails. Some argue that surveillance is necessary to fight extremism and organised crime; others argue that it is an excessive invasion of privacy. This highlights how rights can be controversial and involve difficult trade-offs.

Objectives: 
  • Students will consider the arguments for and against online surveillance, and whether it infringes on the right to privacy
  • Students will consider whether there is a trade-off between freedom and security
Outcomes: 
  • Students will identify arguments for and against online surveillance
  • Students will give a speech about surveillance, giving reasons for their views
  • Students will evaluate statements about human rights, giving reasons for their views
Resources: 
  • A4 white paper
  • IWB with internet
Links to National Curriculum: 

Students consider the precious liberties enjoyed by citizens of the United Kingdom and the role of the police. They debate and evaluate viewpoints and present reasoned arguments.

Plan: 

Starter

  • Project Slides 1 and 2 of MV Citizenship Resource 2.1 Human Rights and Surveillance. Ask students to draw “rights” on A4 paper without using any words. This is trickier than it sounds.  The purpose is to encourage students to creatively consider the concept of rights and what it represents.
  • Show Slide 3, the picture of a CCTV camera looking at a computer. Ask them what they think this picture means. Then play one of the two video clips. The first clip, from BBC Newsround (http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/22841713), is easier to understand. The second clip, from the main BBC news (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-18437956), is more complex and will challenge the understanding of higher ability groups.

Phase 1

  • Show Slides 4 to 15 and ask students to imagine that they are Prime Minister. On their first day in office, they are confronted with a difficult decision about the extent of surveillance: While security services want to monitor phone calls and emails, there are concerns about invasion of privacy.
  • Give out print-outs of MV Citizenship Resource 2.2 How far should surveillance go. Alternatively, cut the sheets up into six different cards and ask students to study the information in groups, with each student feeding back to the rest of the group on information on their card.
  • As students read the information, they can copy and complete the table given on the Slide 16.

Phase 2

  • Show Slide 17 and tell students that they must make their decision and prepare a speech justifying their reasons. The support sheet, MV Citizenship Resource 2.3 Writing a speech, can be used by those students who need support.

Phase 3

  • Show Slide 18 and hold a “press conference”. Selected students must give a speech in the role of Prime Minister. The rest of the class are journalists who can question or challenge their views. Depending on the class, you may wish to have a group act as a   “team of ministers” as well as or instead of having just one Prime Minister, allowing more students to participate and supporting lower abilities.
  • After watching students’ contributions, you may wish to play the clip of David Cameron on Slide 19 giving a press conference about surveillance laws. (The first thirty seconds of the clip are best.  After that the detail will be too specific for many students to follow.) http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/jul/10/emergency-surveillance-laws-rushed-through-cross-party-support

Plenary

  • Spectrum line: Ask students to think back over both sessions on human rights. There are five controversial statements on Slides 20 to 25.  For each statement, students should move to one side or the other of the room to show their level of agreement. Ask students to justify where they are standing.
  • Having explored the Human Rights Act, is it a useful framework for living in a safe, equitable society?
  • Refer back to Miriam’s story and the theme: Different Needs, Common Ground. How does it relate to human rights?

Session 3: How do we make change in a democracy?

Citizenship
Citizenship
Focus: 
  • How do we make change in a democracy?
  • Exploring democratic process as a non-violent alternative for resolving conflict on personal, local, national and global levels
Key Message: 

There are many “tools” to affect change in a democratic society. Change is never easy; no tool is perfect and all require patience and the ability to listen to others.

Objectives: 
  • Students will explore the different tools that are available to make change in a democratic society
  • Students will consider the different ways in which these tools may be used
Outcomes: 
  • Students will identify different ways of making change in a democracy
  • Students will explore the advantages and disadvantages of different methods
  • Students will develop skills that are needed to make effective change
Resources: 
  • Post-it notes
  • IWB (with internet – optional)
Links to National Curriculum: 

Students will consider the role of citizens in democratic government, the roles played by public institutions and voluntary groups in society, and the ways in which citizens work together to improve their communities.

Plan: 

Starter

  • Before the start of the session, print out MV Citizenship Resource 3.2 Tools of change images and place them around the classroom.
  • This session starts by using the analogy of redecorating a house to get students thinking about the different ways that it is possible to make change in a democracy.
  • Begin by projecting Slides 1 and 2 of MV Citizenship Resource 3.1 Making change.  Ask students to think about their home. If they could change one thing, what would it be? Is it ever possible to have the perfect home? Slide 3:  Have they ever helped to redecorate a room or do DIY? If they wanted to change something in their home, what tools would they need? (Hammer, spanner, paintbrush, screwdriver, drill etc).

Phase 1

  • Slide 4: Now, instead of thinking about their house, ask students to think about the whole country. What would they like to change? They can write their ideas on post-it notes and stick on the board. Do they think these ideas are possible? Realistic? How could they make these things happen?
  • Slides 5 to 7: Introduce the “toolbox of change”. Just as you need the right tools to redecorate a house, you also need the right tools if you want to make changes to the country. Working in pairs (or groups), students look at the images displayed around the classroom and think about the different tools and how they might be used, completing MV Citizenship Resource 3.3 Tools of change sheet as they go.
  • Note that while some of the tools may be obvious, others will be less so (e.g. the cup of tea, used here to symbolize the power of having conversations and building face-to-face relationships with people; or the bike lock, a tool often used by direct action activists who may chain themselves to fences or gates during a blockade). It doesn’t matter if students don’t get the “correct” answers; the point is that they start thinking creatively about ways to make change. You may want to talk them through one example to give them the idea.

Plenary 1

  • Ask students to feedback their ideas. Use the images and keywords on Slides 9 to 18 to support and enrich their suggestions.  Some of the images are linked to news stories or web pages that will give you detailed examples if you want to explore any of these tools in more depth.

Phase 2

  • Ask students to discuss the different tools by answering the questions on the Slide 19. This could be done orally or as a written activity; individually, in groups, or as a whole class.
  • Ask students to think about the kind of skills and qualities they need to make effective change. (You could extend the “decorating a house” analogy here by first asking them what skills and qualities they would need for that task).
  • Slide 20: Ask students to draw stick person. Around the head, they should write the knowledge that they need to make change (who is for and against their idea; evidence to support their arguments; who has the power to make a decision, etc). Around the heart, they should write the personal qualities (determination, patience, confidence etc). Around the hands, they should write skills (listening skills, public speaking, computer skills etc).

Plenary 2

  • Discuss students’ ideas from the stick person activity. At the moment, what skills and qualities do they already have? What skills and qualities do they need to work on?
  • Slide 21: Question: What might make it difficult to make change in a democracy? This is an opportunity to remind students that they can’t always get their own way.  Perhaps others disagree with them, maybe they’ve got their facts wrong, or maybe there are deeper problems with society still being unfair.
  • Slide 22: Students place themselves in the room according to how much they agree or disagree with the statement, “Violence is an acceptable way to make change.”  Slide 23 brings the session to an end by relating this session to Miriam’s story.  Those who used violence on 7/7 had non-violent alternatives that would not have contravened the rights of others.

Sessions 4 and 5: A third runway for Heathrow? A case study of change through democracy

Citizenship
Citizenship
Focus: 
  • Different Needs, Common Ground
  • A third runway for Heathrow? A case study of change through democracy
Key Message: 

Whenever the government has to make a decision, there will be some who agree and others who disagree. In a democracy, there are a wide range of methods that can be used to try to influence the outcome. A good example is the decision about whether or not to build a third runway at Heathrow airport.

Objectives: 
  • Students will consider the reasons why there are different views about plans for a third runway at Heathrow airport.
  • Students will creatively apply their prior learning to the Heathrow case study.
Outcomes: 
  • In the roles of different parties affected by the runway, students will develop their own ideas about how to influence the government’s decision.
  • Students will evaluate real actions taken around the issue, considering whether these actions are likely to be effective or not.
Resources: 
  • Materials for making posters (A3 paper or bigger)
  • Post-it notes
Links to National Curriculum: 

Students will consider the role of citizens in democratic government, the roles played by public institutions and voluntary groups in society, and the ways in which citizens work together to improve their communities.

Plan: 

Starter

  • This session uses the third runway at Heathrow as a case study of democratic change. The focus is on the ways that people have campaigned on the issue, rather than the details of the runway itself. Note that this is designed to cover two sessions.  You may want to display the print-outs of the images of the tools of change from the previous session around the room.
  • Begin by showing Slides 1 and 2 of MV Citizenship Resource 4.1 Heathrow case study, the image of a low-flying plane above someone’s house. Ask students what the people in the plane and the people in the house might be thinking. Draw out the idea that they might have very different views: for instance, the person in the plane might be relaxing and going off on holiday, while the person in the house might be annoyed by the aircraft noise.

Phase 1

  • Slide 3: Heathrow is the busiest airport in the UK.  Slide 4: It currently has two runways, but they are building a third.
  • Slide 5: Show students the images of four people who might be affected by a third runway. Ask them to think about whether these people are likely to be for or against the runway and why. Students don’t need to get detailed arguments on either side, but should be aware of general issues in the debate: Noise, climate change, jobs, business. Also point out that there are villages in the path of the third runway.
  • Slide 6: Play students the video from the Guardian website, “Heathrow Picnic and Protest” (5 minutes). It shows a woman and her children going to a protest against the third runway at Heathrow airport. Ask students to answer the questions on the slide.
  • Slide 7: Remind the class about the “tools of change” from the previous session.
  • Slide 8: Divide students into seven groups and assign each group one of the roles. Give each group a print-out of one of the sheets from MV Citizenship Resource 4.1 Plan an action. In groups, students should plan a campaign either for or against the runway depending on the role they have been assigned. Encourage them to think creatively about how they could use the tools of change.
  • Slide 9: Show students the slide with posters about the third runway and talk about their features. Slide 10: Ask them to design their own poster, encouraging people to join their campaign and take an action: e.g. writing a letter, signing a petition, attending a protest. A more challenging activity for G&T students could be to write a speech instead.

Plenary 1

  • Ask students to look at each other’s posters. In particular, they should think about the action the poster is asking them to take: Why might people take this action, and why might they not?  Slide 11: They could write their ideas on post-it notes and stick them on each others’ posters.

Phase 2

  • Slide 12: Students work in pairs. Give out (A3) print-outs of MV Citizenship Resource 4.3 No third runway. It gives six examples, taken from real sources quoted at the bottom, of actions taken by opponents of the runway. Students read the examples and then match each one to the pictures on the sheet.
  • There are questions on Slide 12 to encourage students to think about the different actions that people have taken.
  • Alternatively, if the students have internet access you may wish to use MV Citizenship Resource 4.4 Online research sheet with links to websites and newspaper articles about actions people have taken on the third runway. You could ask students to follow these links and, in each case, try to identify which “tool of change” is being used.  You may wish to extend this activity by asking students to find their own links about the third runway and presenting them to the rest of the group.

Plenary 2

  • Slide 13: Bring the class back together.  With a show of hands, take a vote on whether or not the plans for the third runway should go ahead.  They can vote for, against or abstain.  Students can explain their reasons.  Record how many vote for each option.  What is the outcome?  How does the class feel about it?
  • Slide 14: Questions to reinforce learning from this activity:
    1. Did everybody who wanted the runway have the same reasons for wanting it? What about the people who were against the runway?
    2. Why is it important to find evidence to support your view?
    3. Is it easy to make change?  Why / why not?

Homework

  • Introduce the activity for Session 6.  By the end of today’s session the class should have chosen its own issue and split into the number of groups that will represent different parties in the following session.  Research and complete individual copies of MV Citizenship Resource 6.1 Class case study plan an action for the following session.

Session 6: A local issue of the class’s choice

Citizenship
Citizenship
Focus: 
  • Different Needs, Common Ground
  • A local issue of the class’s choice
Key Message: 
  • Whenever a decision has to be made, there will be some who agree and others who disagree.  In a democracy, there are a wide range of methods that can be used to try to influence the outcome non-violently. Having explored the example of Heathrow’s third runway, learning is now applied to a self-selected issue of interest, and connections are made between this and personal, local, national and global matters.
Objectives: 
  • Students will consider why there are different views about their chosen issue.
  • Students will creatively apply their prior learning to their chosen issue.
  • Students will relate the content of the module to the aims of the Miriam’s Vision resource
Outcomes: 
  • In the roles of different parties affected by the selected issue, students will develop their own ideas about how to influence decisions in their personal, local, national and global communities.
  • Students will evaluate real issues, considering actions that are likely to be effective.
  • Students will extrapolate from Miriam’s story to their own lives.
Links to National Curriculum: 
  • Students will consider the ways in which citizens work together to improve their communities.
Plan: 

Starter

  • Ask students to think back to the start of the module when they thought about an aspect of their home that they would like to change, and then an aspect of the country.  Now they are going to think of something about the school or the local area that they would like to change.

Phase 1

  • The format of this part of this session is up to you.  The main point is to distinguish the different interested parties in the class’s chosen issue and have groups representing each one.
  • Groups can share their completed MV Citizenship Resource 6.1 Class case study plan an action with each other and decide which “tools of change” they are going to employ, and how.  They can plan strategies, make posters, write petitions, or any other action from the range they have explored.
  • You may choose to set up a debate in which groups can make their cases in role, with a Q&A.

Plenary 1

  • Either in role or as themselves (or both), take a vote on the class’s chosen issue.  They can vote for, against or abstain.  Students can explain their reasons.  Record how many vote for each option.  What is the outcome?  Does it seem fair?  How does the class feel about it?

Module plenary

  • Project MV Citizenship Resource 6.2 Module plenary.  Ask students to reflect on all their learning from the module. Slide 2:  Ask them to draw around their hand. Then, on the four fingers, they should write: 1) A right they have; 2) A way they can make change; 3) A new thing they’ve learned; 4) A question they still have. Finally, in the palm of the hand they should think about the most important thing they have learned and write a thought they’d like to keep forever.
  • The hands in themselves do not provide a deep reflection on learning.  Use them as a basis for a reflective discussion about the entire unit, especially focusing on what students think are important about human rights and democracy.
  • Slide 3:  It would be powerful to end the module with a return to the purpose of the Miriam’s Vision resource.  Although there have been positive outcomes to 7/7, was it an avoidable event?   Refer back to Miriam’s Story (you may want to replay the video package) and reflect on why the Miriam Hyman Memorial Trust places emphasis on the importance of democracy and human rights.
  • How can the Miriam’s Vision Citizenship module help?  (By learning what happened on 7/7 and understanding its far-reaching consequences; by understanding that people have the choice to influence events in their personal, local, national and global communities constructively and non-violently; by applying lessons learned to future personal and wider situations, etc.)
  • Slide 4:  Students can share personal experiences or knowledge of issues that have split groups (which could include families) or communities.  How were the issues tackled?  Were they resolved?  Could they have been better resolved?  How?  This provides opportunities for students to relate the contents of this module to themselves and their own lives.  Sharing in (non-friendship) pairs can sometimes have surprisingly rewarding personal outcomes, and as a whole class students may inspire each other.
  • Slide 5:  Refer to the subtitle of the module, Different Needs, Common Ground, as a fitting close, and end with the following questions:
    • Having explored some aspects of democratic process, is democracy a viable alternative for resolving conflict?
    • Has anything in this module inspired you? If so, what? How?
    • How does Miriam's story relate to the module? (Her right to life was violated by people who used violence to try to make a point, or a change.)

    Please allow 10 minutes at the end of the session for students to complete the Student Survey. Please collect the surveys at the end and submit them to the MHMT. If you are participating in our Evaluation & Impact Study this is vital. Thank you.