Making a Difference

“Miriam’s Vision” Business & Enterprise
Miriam’s Vision is about building an inclusive, non-violent society, respecting fundamental rights. This cannot be over-emphasised to students, whenever the opportunity arises.
 

Practicalities

The Miriam's Vision Business & Enterprise Module consists of a set of lesson plans in the form of guided instructions. Resources (electronic and otherwise) are listed at the beginning of each lesson plan and highlighted within the plans for ease of reference. You have everything you need on this website to deliver Miriam's Vision in your classroom.
 

The Miriam’s Vision Business & Enterprise Scheme of Work may be preceded by the Miriam’s Vision Art and Dance modules to make displays and products to support this activity.

The focus of the module is Making a Difference. It is about raising awareness of need on a global level and engaging in altruistic activities that make an impact in the real world, in this case making the link between the Miriam Hyman Children’s Eye Care Centre in Odisha and Miriam’s Vision of a more inclusive society.

Altruism is behaviour that benefits others. By planning, organising and executing a fundraising event and reflecting on it, students will experience one altruistic process and in doing so develop an understanding that there are benefits to the receiver (alleviation of need) and to the giver (a sense of purpose, self-esteem, satisfaction).

We have provided resources to support your Enterprise venture, for you to adapt to your students and setting. Learning about Business and developing Enterprise skills, students will not only understand the role of charities in supporting altruistic activities that make an impact in the real world, but also see how they themselves can make a difference to others by organising an event to raise funds for the Miriam Hyman Children’s Eye Care Centre in Odisha, India and its Outreach Programme (www.miriam-hyman.com).

Donating to this particular cause is obviously closely related to the other elements of the Miriam’s Vision collection of resources. However, the materials can be adapted to support any chosen cause. As long as the students are having an altruistic impact on the real world, we are happy for these materials to be used as widely as possible.

The value of our model is in preparing students for adulthood. In addition to altruistic values, it is about self-development and self-management, developing financial skills, problem solving, working in teams, and developing good communication and negotiating skills.

Sessions will vary in length according to how much students produce rather than source for their event and you may, as a result, require more than six sessions. Do feel free to adapt to meet the exact needs of your students.

Beyond the suggestion of working in mixed ability groups there is no specific differentiation in this module. However, as students begin by assessing their own skill level and setting their own development targets, the structure of the module lends itself to personalised learning.

There is no fixed model for the fundraising event. Ideally the module would be delivered to all the classes in a year group. We also strongly suggest extending this module across more than one year group to create a collective context and extend the scale of the fundraising Enterprise event. It could be run by all the KS3 classes if you choose. One year group could be responsible for products, another for services and the third for the organisation of the event.

Consider inviting the community and local businesses and services to your event. Be explicit with the students; this can create and improve relationships and perhaps useful opportunities in the future, and increase a sense of community and mutual support.

Secondary themes of social cohesion and responsible citizenship have been included; developing “tolerance” and “understanding” through an appreciation of the different cultures and religions that make up our communities can also be incorporated into this module as part of the product research, design and development process. Students can explore their own cultural heritage to compliment the Indian colours, flavours and traditions of Odisha.

Please allow 10 minutes at the end of the session for students to complete the Student Survey. Please collect the surveys at the end and submit them to the MHMT. If you are participating in our Evaluation & Impact Study this is vital. Thank you.

Module Outline

Task

Focus

Activity

Session 1

Miriam’s Vision

Understanding altruism

 

Miriam’s Story

Introductory PPT

 

Session 2

Identifying skills

Business & Enterprise skills assessment

Fundraiser project ideas

Session 3

Being Enterprising

Applying skills to brainstormed ideas

Designing a market research survey

Session 4

Developing awareness of the needs of others on a global level

Product planning  

Decision making

Goal setting

Session 5

Product Development

Creating products and sourcing services to sell

Session 6

Event Planning and Organisation

Advertising and promotion

Running the fair

Session 7

Evaluating Success

Making a Difference

Personal reflection

Activity write-up


Each session designed to be delivered in a lesson slot of approximately an hour, except where students are creating their products / rehearsing their performances and promoting and running the actual event.

Citizenship National Curriculum KS3 (England)

The following from the curriculum is covered:

Purpose of study
A high-quality citizenship education helps to provide pupils with knowledge, skills and understanding to prepare them to play a full and active part in society.

Aims

  • To develop an interest in, and commitment to, participation in volunteering as well as other forms of responsible activity, that they will take with them into adulthood
  • To equip students with the financial skills to enable them to manage their money on a day-to-day basis as well as to plan for future financial needs.


Subject content

  • “…the roles played by public institutions and voluntary groups in society, and the ways in which citizens work together to improve their communities (including opportunities to participate in school-based activities)”
  • “…the functions and uses of money, the importance of personal budgeting, money management and a range of financial products and services”

PSHE Association guidelines

“PSHE education is a non-statutory subject. However, in order to fulfil its duties relating to SMSC, behaviour and safety, and to provide a broad and balanced curriculum which meets pupils’ needs and prepares them for the challenges and opportunities of adult life, a school’s best approach is to ensure that a comprehensive programme of PSHE education is in place.
“The benefits to pupils of such an approach are numerous as PSHE prepares them to manage many of the most critical opportunities, challenges and responsibilities they will face growing up. It also helps them to connect and apply the knowledge and understanding they learn in all subjects to practical, real-life situations while helping them to feel safe and secure enough to fulfil their academic potential.”

Enterprise

“There is no universally accepted definition of Enterprise learning. It is often mistakenly regarded as being synonymous with the development of entrepreneurial skills, but an important distinction needs to be made between the two. Entrepreneurship is about starting up businesses, particularly involving risk. Entrepreneurs need to be enterprising to succeed and survive. However, only a relatively small proportion of the working population will become entrepreneurs, while all adults need to be enterprising both in their work and in their personal lives. Businesses need employees who are innovative in their approach to solving problems, can cope with uncertainty and change, communicate well and are able to work effectively in teams. The development of these skills in young people is therefore an essential part of the preparation for adult life.” (Ofsted: Learning to be Enterprising)

PSHE: Economic wellbeing and financial capability

Key Concepts

1.2 Capability
a. Exploring what it means to be enterprising.

1.4 Economic understanding

a) Understanding the economic and business environment.

Key processes

2.1 Self-development

a) develop and maintain their self-esteem and envisage a positive future for themselves in work

b) assess their needs, interests, values, skills, abilities and attitudes in relation to options in learning, work and enterprise

2.3 Enterprise
a) Identify the main qualities and skills needed to enter and thrive in the working world

c) Assess undertake, and manage risk

f) Develop approaches to working with others, problem-solving and action planning

h) Develop and apply skills and qualities for enterprise
i) Demonstrate and apply understanding of economic ideas

Resources Downloads: 
Making a Difference

Session 1: Introduction to the Miriam’s Vision B&E project

Business and Enterprise
Business and Enterprise
Focus: 
  • Introduction to Miriam Hyman and the Miriam’s Vision Business & Enterprise resource and purpose
Key Message: 
  • To raise awareness of the needs of others on a global level and to engage in altruistic activities to make a positive difference to the lives of others.
Objectives: 
  • The role of the charity
  • To understand that some people rely on the altruistic acts of others to support them
Outcomes: 
  • Students will understand the wider purpose of their study
  • Students will understand the meaning of altruism and identify key qualities
Links to National Curriculum: 

In this session, students will learn about the role played by the Miriam Hyman Memorial Trust, as a voluntary group in society, and about the ways in which students as citizens can work together to improve their communities; including the opportunity to participate in the fundraising event.

Links to the PSHE non statutory curriculum

  • Preparing students for the challenges of adult life.
  • Developing empathy and cooperation.
Plan: 

Starter

  • Show Miriam's Story videos 1 to 4 of 4 (unless you have preceded the Business & Enterprise module with any of the other Miriam’s Vision modules, in which case just play Miriam's Story video 4 of 4 to remind students about the Miriam Hyman Children’s Eye Care Centre as the focus of your fundraising). MV Resource 0 Info for Students.pdf is a single page summary of Miriam's Vision and its aims. Print and distribute a copy to each student.
  • Highlight that without the support of the Miriam Hyman Children’s Eye Care Centre, children from the region of Odisha and beyond would not have access to eye care services and many would go blind (for more information see http://www.miriam-hyman.com/mhcecc-partnership.html).
  • Compare the situation of the children in India to that of your students, who have free access to the vision services offered by the UK National Health Service should they need them.
  • Now show MV B&E Resource 1.1 Role of the MHMT PowerPoint and introduce the role of the MHMT as a charity and the benefactor of your Business & Enterprise venture.

Activity 1

  • Groups:  Students consider different human needs, such as food, shelter, safety, health care, education, friendship or transportation and group them according to "material needs" and "emotional needs".  Do any belong in both groups? (You could discuss the dual role of, for example food.  It is a material need but not having enough of it has emotional consequences.  You could discuss the material role of shelter and the emotional consequences of being without it.)
  • Feedback and collate responses as a class.  You could create a separate column in the list to distinguish “needs” from “wants”.
  • How do you define a “charity”? Share this definition: “Non-Government Organisations (or NGO’s), otherwise called charities, are organisations and businesses that reinvest all their profits supporting those in need”. Brainstorm a list of charities and their respective causes.
  • How do you define “altruism”?  Share this definition: “Altruism is giving something for the benefit of someone else”.  Brainstorm what can be given for the benefit of someone else.  (Resources available, for example, time, money, goods, networking on behalf of someone else, etc.)  Brainstorm a list of examples e.g. harvest festival, looking after someone who needs help, doing a job for free (volunteering), getting sponsors for a friend, telling people about a project you’re involved in, donating to a charity, etc.

Activity 2

  • Student groups research and record how the needs they identified in Activity 1 are met within either their local community or society as a whole.
  • Students suggest altruistic activities that could help the members of society for whom these needs are not met e.g. shelters for the homeless, food banks and soup kitchens for the hungry etc.

Plenary

  • Feedback group work and introduce how the Business & Enterprise sessions will be used to experience altruism in action; to plan and organise a fundraising fair in aid of the Outreach Programme at the Miriam Hyman Children’s Eye Care Centre to help Make a Difference to the children requiring eye care services in and around Odisha.
  • Discuss the qualities of altruism; empathy, generosity and cooperation.  What are their advantages and disadvantages?  Do the advantages outweigh the disadvantages?

Homework

Students consider ways in which they could raise funds for the MHCECC.  (N.B. Don’t introduce any specifications at this stage to see what they come up with.)

 

Session 2: Identifying Business & Enterprise skills

Business and Enterprise
Business and Enterprise
Focus: 
  • Identifying Business & Enterprise skills
Key Message: 

Anyone can make a positive difference to the lives of others. “It’s not who you are, but what you do that defines you.”

Objectives: 
  • To identify what enterprise skills are and how they relate to our everyday lives
Outcomes: 
  • Students will understand the wider purpose of their study
  • Students will assess how enterprising they already are and identify at least one skill they would like to develop
Resources: 
  • Highlighter pens
  • Student access to the internet (alternatively this can be added to the homework task)
  • IWB
Links to National Curriculum: 

Students will consider ways in which they as citizens can work together to improve their communities, including the opportunity to participate in the fundraising event.

Links to the PSHE non statutory curriculum

Exploring what is means to be enterprising and assessing their own needs, interests, values, skills, abilities and attitudes in relation to options in learning, work and Enterprise.

Plan: 

Starter

  • Share students’ fundraising suggestions and record as blue sky thinking (creative ideas not limited by practicalities) for reference later in the session.
  • Show MV B&E Resource 2.1 Intro PowerPoint to recap the key points of Miriam’s Story and to introduce the Business & Enterprise skills focus.

Activity 1

  • Using MV B&E Resource 2.2 Student skills students reflect on the Business & Enterprise skills of innovation, research, decision making, problem solving, communication, organisation, team working and self-management.
  • They consider their personal strengths and weaknesses in each, highlight their current ability and identify at least one skill they would like to develop.  Guide less able and ESL students with examples.
  • Students complete MV B&E Resource 2.3 Mindmap activity to relate each skill to an area of their lives where it is already applied. Some examples:
    • Innovation: Finding better ways of doing things.  Examples?
    • Problem solving: Resourcing your character in Minecraft
    • Research: Finding out what’s showing at the cinema
    • Decision making: Choosing which film to watch at the cinema
    • Communication: Texting your friends and family
    • Team work: Preparing for a party
    • Self-management - getting up and dressed in the morning on time
    • Organisation - getting to the right class with the right books and equipment

Activity 2

  • In mixed ability groups, using the internet and any available secondary resources, students research possible Indian themed crafts and activities to bring the culture, flavour and focus of Odisha to your fundraising event.
  • You could also brainstorm ideas from students’ own cultures, to develop the secondary themes of understanding and tolerance: “Appreciating our differences to make a difference to others”.

The following list is suggestions of Indian crafts and traditions for students to research:

  • Applique lanterns: see the Miriam’s Vision Art module
  • Clay diva (candle holders)
  • Henna hand tattoos
  • Rangoli
  • Beaded bangles
  • Tie dyed clothing
  • Indian snacks – samosa, bahji, naan, barfi
  • Indian dance (see Miriam’s Vision Dance module) miriamsvision.org/dance

Plenary

  • Discuss how students will use their skills to plan and organise a fundraising fair in aid of the Outreach Programme at the Miriam Hyman Children’s Eye Care Centre to help “Make a Difference” to the children requiring eye care services in and around Odisha.
  • Collect completed MV B&E Resource 2.2 Student skills (required for Sessions 3 and 6) and introduce homework task.

Homework

Using the blue sky ideas list, together with the research undertaken in Activity 2, students consider ideas for fundraising stalls. This time ideas MUST

  • be workable and acceptable within school
  • reflect the need to maximise profits for the Outreach Programme at the MHCECC.

Session 3: Being enterprising

Business and Enterprise
Business and Enterprise
Focus: 

Being enterprising

Key Message: 

Making a practical and positive difference to the lives of others

Objectives: 

To consider ways in which students could raise funds for the Outreach Programme at the MHCECC in Odisha, India

Outcomes: 
  • Students will brainstorm and evaluate a list of possible crafts, stalls, services and displays for a fundraising fair
  • Students will design a survey to market research their ideas
Resources: 
  • IWB with internet
Links to National Curriculum: 

To develop an interest in, and commitment to, participation in volunteering as well as other forms of responsible activity, that [students] will take with them into adulthood

Links to the PHSE non statutory curriculum

Exploring what it means to be enterprising and assessing their needs, interests, values, skills, abilities and attitudes in relation to options in learning, work and enterprise.

Plan: 

Starter

  • Begin by asking students to respond to a number of questions of taste, such as favourite colour, favourite food, television programmes, etc. Students could shout out responses, or stand up or put their hand up if they like a particular product.
  • Explain that people’s tastes are very diverse and products need to be marketed to appeal to different sorts of people.
  • As an example of ways in which one product / service can be adapted to appeal to different audiences, show the short (2.14 minutes) animation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dp3NK7TMMzw which explains how different web videos appeal to different audiences and why choosing the right one for your business or product will increase sales.
  • Remind students of the activity focus Making a Difference. Discuss the market appeal of the products you are planning to develop and consider how this might affect the way you promote them.

Activity 1

  • Split students into 4 to 6 mixed ability groups.
  • Students share their fundraising research and ideas with the rest of their group and using the MV B&E Resource 3.1 Decision Making worksheet they begin to consider which ideas they’d like to carry through to sell at the fair.
  • Students record their three best / favourite ideas for development.  They may need to negotiate to come to an agreement.

Activity 2

  • Using MV Business & Enterprise resource 3.2 Market Research Grid to help them, students create a simple market research questionnaire to find out which product or service their potential customers would prefer, and additional information to support their approach to the task, e.g. how much people are willing to pay, when would be best to hold the fair etc.

Plenary

  • Recap key lessons from session.
  • Introduce homework.

Homework

Using the questionnaire they’ve created in their groups, each individual student needs to ask at least 3 people (potentially attending the fair) for their opinions on the proposed event and the product or service ideas presented.

N.B. the more data students collect the more reliable the conclusions drawn from that data are likely to be.

Session 4: Developing awareness of the needs of others

Business and Enterprise
Business and Enterprise
Focus: 
  • Developing awareness of the needs of others on a global level
  • Product planning
Key Message: 
  • Understanding your target audience is key to creating a successful product
  • Maximising profit will increase the funds for donation and therefore the impact for those who need the support of the charity.
Objectives: 
  • To understand the importance of research and planning
  • To understand pricing
Outcomes: 
  • Students will calculate the cost of their fundraising idea in order to set prices
  • Students will set roles and goals for their group
Resources: 
Links to National Curriculum: 

Students will understand some of the principles of business money management such as price setting, cash flow and profit.

Links to the non-statutory PHSE curriculum

Students will improve their economic understanding and develop approaches to working with others, problem-solving and action planning.

Plan: 

Starter

  • Using the MV B&E Resource 4.1 4Ps PowerPoint summarise and discuss key points.
  • Remind students that the fundraising event is an altruistic activity i.e. funds raised are for the benefit of others.  Profitability of their product ideas directly affects the difference that they could make to the children needing eye care services from the Outreach Programme at the Miriam Hyman Children’s Eye Care Centre in Odisha, India.

Activity 1

  • In the same groups as before, students research the materials required and associated costs of their fundraising ideas online.
  • Using MV B&E Resource 4.2 Price Setting Worksheet students calculate the total costs to inform the price setting of their product / service ideas
  • Assist students along the way with this task

Activity 2

  • Students present their costed ideas back to the class. Add drama to this by treating it like a pitch!
  • Students vote on which products and services should be developed to sell at the fair. They should consider feasibility of making the products, the money they are likely to make, the time involved, and link to Indian culture and / or cultures in your class.
  • At this stage you may wish to allow students to change groups to align with their skills and strengths

Activity 3

  • Students reflect on their responses to the skills task MV B&E Resource 2.2 Student skills from Session 1 to help them designate roles within the group.  This helps them to track their own progress and reflect on their skills.
  • IT link:  Higher ability students could create spread sheets to make organisation more systematic.

Plenary

  • Recap key learning from the session.
  • Collect completed copies of MV B&E Resource 2.2 Student skills (required for Session 6).

Homework

  • Students come up with a name for their group and their product / service and begin to plan their product / service development for next session

Session 5: Making a Difference

Business and Enterprise
Business and Enterprise
Focus: 
  • Making a Difference
  • Product development
Key Message: 

Maximising fundraising to maximise impact on others

Objectives: 
  • To create products and services to sell to raise funds for the Outreach Programme of the Miriam Hyman Children’s Eye Care Centre in Odisha, India
Outcomes: 
  • Students develop products / services to sell at the fair
  • Students plan the fundraising event
Resources: 
  • Sufficient quantities of materials identified in previous session
  • Printed copies of instructions (where required) for recipes / craft techniques etc. (Where appropriate consider inviting visitors including local businesses and parent helpers to support students’ ventures.)
Links to National Curriculum: 

Develop an interest in, and commitment to, volunteering that they will take with them into adulthood.

Links to the PHSE non statutory curriculum

Students will develop approaches to working with others, problem-solving and action planning. Through their product development and event planning process they will develop and apply Business & Enterprise skills and qualities.

Plan: 

Starter

  • Students share their group names and confirm the product / service they will be developing (N.B. allow time to discuss if this was not completed for homework)
  • Provide students with a clear explanation of the time and resources available for them to develop their ideas and create their products N.B. this may be one or more sessions depending on the complexity of products chosen

Activity 1

  • Students work in their groups, using the materials provided to create their produce to sell at the fair N.B. students providing a service such as Henna hand tattoos or a dance display will need to consider any special requirements e.g. access to water/music and space to practice their service/dance display [insert link to art and dance resources]

Activity 2

  • Using MV B&E Resource 5.1 Event Planning Checklist in their groups, students begin to plan the actual event, referring back to their market research for timings, layout etc. 
  • Students consider how their product / service will be presented; suggesting ways in which they might decorate their stalls to entice customers in and/or ensure that the purpose of their fundraiser is clear.

Plenary

  • Encourage students to reflect on how well they have worked as a team and to consider the Business & Enterprise skills they have developed as a result of this task

Homework

  • Finish off products
  • Practice services/dance displays

Session 6: Event planning and organisation

Business and Enterprise
Business and Enterprise
Focus: 
  • Event planning and organisation
Key Message: 

Engaging in altruistic acts to help make a difference to others

Objectives: 
  • To name, plan and promote and hold an event at which products and services developed can be sold in order to raise funds to donate to the Miriam Hyman Children’s Eye Care Centre and its Outreach Programme
  • To develop and apply Business & Enterprise skills in a real context
Outcomes: 
  • Students will plan and organise a fundraising event
  • Students will engage with the local community (optional)
Resources: 
  • Planning notes from Session 5
  • A3 paper
  • Art materials
  • Access to design software (optional)
  • All resources for the event
Links to National Curriculum: 

To develop an interest in, and commitment to, participation in volunteering as well as other forms of responsible activity, that [students] will take with them into adulthood.

Links to the PHSE non statutory curriculum

Students will develop approaches to working with others, problem-solving and action planning in a real Business & Enterprise context. Students will develop and apply Business & Enterprise skills and economic understanding.

Plan: 

Starter

  • Decide on a name for your event.  Give students a few moments to think; they could note down their ideas.
  • You may want to vote on a range of suggestions from the students, or you could use the Snowballing technique here.  In pairs students have a few minutes to discuss their ideas, make notes if appropriate, and agree a response. Each pair then joins up with another pair and these groups of four agree a response to the same question.  Depending on time and number of students, this could be repeated again until the whole group agrees a response.  Point out that this method of “voting” can allow for compromise and group decisions.

Activity 1

  • Students design posters, flyers and write news articles for local press and / or develop radio ad campaigns for local radio for the fundraising event.
  • Include the theme Making a Difference.
  • Share and collate group actions using last session’s planning
  • List key information required for promoting the event, including date, time and  venue
  • Consider:
    • Who are the target audience(s) for your promotional material? (e.g. parents, other students)
    • How will this influence the way(s) in which the information is presented?
  • Refer back to market research to consider these points

N.B. Younger students may find it easier to focus on the cultural links rather than altruism in their poster designs

  • Share and evaluate promotional materials created, using the following criteria: Visual impact, content, level of audience identification and persuasiveness

Activity 2

  • Brainstorm and delegate (where required) a comprehensive list of actions required for the successful organisation of the fundraising fair including copying and distributing posters and flyers, setting up a volunteer help rosta for manning stalls and a timetable of displays, asking for raffle donations/selling tickets, organising floats for each stall etc.

Plenary

  • Discuss what elements of the planning process students found challenging and why.  How could they have been done better?

Homework

Good luck with your event!

Remember to take photos and / or video to record and share!

Session 7: Evaluating success

Business and Enterprise
Business and Enterprise
Focus: 
  • Evaluating success
  • Making a Difference
Key Message: 

Maximising our potential in order to maximise the difference that can be made to others

Objectives: 
  • To evaluate the success of the fundraising event in financial terms
  • To reflect on the Business & Enterprise skills developed
  • To reflect on the potential of the individual to have a positive impact on others, including their personal, local, national and global communities.
Outcomes: 
  • Students will evaluate the success of the fundraising event in terms of funds raised for the Miriam Hyman Children’s Eye Care Centre in Bhubaneswar, India
  • Students reflect on the Business & Enterprise skills they have developed through participation
  • Students identify altruistic activities that interest them
  • Students enhance sense of self-esteem, purpose and belonging
Links to National Curriculum: 
  • To develop an interest in, and commitment to, participation in volunteering as well as other forms of responsible activity, that [students] will take with them into adulthood
  • To equip students with the financial skills to enable them to manage their money on a day-to-day basis as well as to plan for future financial needs

 

Links to the PHSE non statutory curriculum

  • Students will reflect on their experience of working with others, problem-solving and action planning in a real Business & Enterprise context
  • Students will develop and maintain self-esteem and envisage a positive future in the workplace.
Plan: 

Starter

  • Calculate the final costs and profits, and the total funds raised for the charity
  • Remind students of the charity being supported: the Miriam Hyman Memorial Trust, specifically Miriam Hyman Children’s Eye Care Centre in Odisha, India and its Outreach Programme.
  • Replay Miriam's Story video 4 of 4 (1.5 minutes).

Activity 1

  • Students reflect on the whole process of planning, organising and promoting the event and researching and creating their cultural products; identifying what they liked/did best and where they felt they could improve if the task were repeated
  • Ask students about any times when they disagreed with each other and how they overcame them
  • Using fresh copies of MV B&E Resource 2.2 Student skills repeat the skills activity from session 1
  • Hand out copies of MV B&E Resource 2.2 Student skills completed previously so that students can compare their reflections now to the original responses recorded in Session 1. Students consider:
    • Which skills have they developed?
    • Which skills still require more work?
    • Where there any changes in skills that surprise them?

Activity 2

  • Students write a report explaining the processes necessary to run the event, so that this type of altruistic activity could be easily replicated.
  • Include information on how the group worked together and overcame any conflict.
  • Include a conclusion that demonstrates key Business & Enterprise skills learned.

Plenary

  • Display MV B&E Resource 7.1 Opinion Spectrum and encourage students to stand along a line in terms of rating how well they think they worked – firstly their group’s opinion and then their own personal opinion
  • Discuss any changes between the group and individual responses
  • Consider presenting a school assembly to share how the event went, how much money was raised, what it will be used for and what students learned. N.B. Inviting any visitors or parent helpers as a thank you for their support would solidify links made in the event.
  • IT link: Consider creating a multi-media report for your school’s website.

N.B. Students could write to MHMT info@miriamsvision.org to inform the charity of the results of their fundraising event.  Donation can be made directly via www.miriam-hyman.com/donate

Module plenary / Homework

Students list other altruistic activities and causes that they are interested in that help Make a Difference.  They could write / record a reflection on the links between Miriam’s story and their learning in this module:  “How can I help to make Miriam’s Vision of a safer, more inclusive society a reality?” (By using the resources available to me to help others, by responding to the needs of others, by working cooperatively, by participating in my personal, local, national and global communities, etc.)

Please allow 10 minutes at the end of the session for students to complete the Student Survey. Please collect the surveys at the end and submit them to the MHMT. If you are participating in our Evaluation & Impact Study this is vital. Thank you.