A Response to the 2005 London Bombings

Miriam’s Vision is about building an inclusive, non-violent society, respecting fundamental rights. This cannot be over-emphasised to students, whenever the opportunity arises.
 

Practicalities

The Miriam's Vision History Module consists of a set of lesson plans in the form of guided instructions. Resources (electronic and otherwise) are listed at the beginning of each lesson plan and highlighted within the plans for ease of reference. You have everything you need on this website to deliver Miriam's Vision in your classroom.
 

Is this history?

It’s a long time since the “twenty year” ruling about history in schools.  GCSE specifications from September 2016 include topics up to 2014 and there is a welcome emphasis in many history classrooms on explaining the modern world.  Of course, we are still living through the consequences of 7/7 and our views on their significance will continue to evolve, but this simply reflects the nature of history as a discipline.  No topic remains static, even those stretching far back in time.  If, however, you feel that the teaching of 7/7 would benefit from some wider historical context, we have included materials for an initial overview lesson on the history of terrorism which we hope are useful.

Why this particular enquiry question? 

There are many possible approaches to teaching about 7/7 in the history classroom.  We have deliberately avoided a sole focus on causation because we felt that a focus on consequences fitted well with the philosophy of Miriam’s Vision. However, it is almost inevitable that the causes of 7/7 will come up in one of the early lessons and you are advised to be ready with a response.  The teachers who piloted these materials reported that questions about cause emerged naturally in the first lesson and that some fruitful discussion took place, but they also reported that the pupils found a focus on consequences a refreshing change.

Our focus on the key (or second-order) concept of “consequences” was the result of much debate.  We considered “significance” but felt that the event was too recent for such judgments to be possible.  We also considered ‘change’ but rejected this for the same reason.  “Evidence” was another contender, but we felt this didn’t focus on the personal dimension sufficiently.  We have therefore chosen to focus on the consequences of 7/7 which fits well with the overall aims of the education programme. This focus includes a range of different kinds of consequences: short-term and long-term, direct and indirect, personal and impersonal, positive and negative. We suggest that you approach the analysis of consequences much as you would handle an analysis of causes i.e. encourage the students to categorise and link different consequences together.  You will see in the final outcome and mark scheme that this is the approach we have taken.

Overall, the module presents a classic historical enquiry: A big question is posed which is informed by one of the key concepts and pupils engage critically with a range of relevant source material in order to reach their own considered and substantiated conclusion.

Please allow 10 minutes at the end of the final session for students to complete the Student Survey. Please collect the surveys at the end and submit them to the MHMT. If you are participating in our Evaluation & Impact Study this is vital. Thank you.

Miriam’s Vision History module outline

Task

Focus

Activity

Session 1

What happened on 7th July 2005 (“7/7”)?

What do students know about 7/7?

Find out about Miriam Hyman

Start to record consequences of 7/7

Session 2

Personal consequences (1): Who was affected by 7/7?

Summarise who was involved in 7/7

Expand list of consequences

Session 3

Personal consequences (2): Can negative events have positive consequences?

How one family has responded to 7/7

Expand list of consequences

Session 4

What were the wider consequences of 7/7?

Who was responsible?

Expand list of consequences

Session 5

Analysing the consequences of 7/7

Who was responsible?

Categorise and sort consequences

Session 6

What happened after the London bombings?

Can we apply Miriam’s story to our own lives?

Guided freeform plenary making reference to themes and objectives of the module and the resource

History National Curriculum KS3

The following from the curriculum is covered

Purpose of study

“Teaching should equip pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. History helps pupils to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.”

Aims

  • know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day
  • understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed
  • gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales.

Subject content

Challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day, including social, cultural and technological change in post-war British society.

Click here for an article about this module or you can visit our Publications page. "Teaching the very recent past: 'Miriam's Vision' and the London Bombings", The Historical Association, Teaching History, September 2016

Resources Downloads: 
A Response to the 2005 London Bombings

Different Backgrounds, Common Ground

Miriam’s Vision is about building an inclusive, non-violent society, respecting fundamental rights. This cannot be over-emphasised to students, whenever the opportunity arises.
 

Practicalities

The Miriam's Vision Geography Module consists of a set of lesson plans in the form of guided instructions. Resources (electronic and otherwise) are listed at the beginning of each lesson plan and highlighted within the plans for ease of reference. You have everything you need on this website to deliver Miriam's Vision in your classroom.
 

For ease of reference, we will often refer to the 2005 London bombings as “7/7”. The four-part Miriam’s Story video package (total 8 minutes) is embedded in the Schemes of Work in all the Miriam’s Vision curriculum areas.

The module subtitle, Different Backgrounds, Common Ground, refers to the balance that must be achieved between different interested parties regarding conflicting interests and should be referred to frequently throughout the module, in order to stimulate personal reflection.

“Conflict” as a concept explored within the context of a geographical enquiry is a unique angle through which to develop students’ understanding of human geography first hand. They experience the lives of different people in Odisha, India, in the developing world and immerse themselves in the conflicting interests presented.

“What should we consider when making decisions with conflicting interests?” is the overall enquiry question that you will need to refer to frequently, but there are also prompts to consider how this relates to Miriam’s story and how this is relevant to students' own lives.

Where possible, we have provided resources that are not dependent on internet access including key development indicators, statistics, maps and case studies. Bespoke Miriam’s Vision resources include the Miriam’s Story four-part video package (total eight minutes) and a range of others. They are referred to in the plans. You will need an interactive whiteboard.

Although the curriculum focus is on providing a detailed example for a human geography study, this module can also be used as the basis of a place knowledge study for Asia, which could be complemented by relevant sources online towards a comparative study with Africa.

These plans are guides only. We have provided enough material for seven sessions, and you may wish to be selective depending on time and the abilities of your class. If you are participating in the Miriam's Vision Evaluation & Impact Study, please deviate from the plans as little as possible.

Timings are not included, as we know you will wish to adapt and select according to the needs of your class. We have assumed sessions of about an hour – any less and you will certainly need to modify the plans or may need to extend the enquiry to more sessions.

Session 7 provides opportunity and guidance for a short (assessment) task in which students extrapolate what they have learned to a local example. Although this session is optional, the crux of Miriam's Vision is for students to be able to transfer their learning to their own lives and situations so we strongly suggest that the session is included. We have included some differentiation but you may need further adaptation to meet the individual needs of your students.

Finally, you will need to be aware of possible sensitivities around this topic. Some students may have been directly or indirectly affected by 7/7 or other incidents themselves and there are also potential religious sensitivities.

The Miriam’s Vision Geography Scheme of Work may be preceded by the Miriam’s Vision PSHE module (three sessions). You may choose to focus on one or other curriculum area, or teach both together. However, the first PSHE session (about Miriam and 7/7) does help to provide context for the other modules, helping students to reflect on issues raised from a personal perspective and to support their responses to areas of conflict in their own lives.

Miriam’s Vision Geography Module Outline

Task

Focus

Activity

Session 1

Miriam’s Vision

Locating and finding out about India and Odisha

Miriam’s story

Map work

Fact files

Session 2

Detailed enquiry on Odisha and the development issues it faces

Measuring development

Industry sector sort

 

Session 3

Mining conflict in Odisha

Map work

Case studies

Exploring impacts

Session 4

Reflection on mining impacts

Card sort

Impact visualisation

Session 5

Understanding the impact on tribal groups

Comparative activity

Debate

Session 6

Conflict resolution with respect to mining in Odisha

Role play

Opinion spectrum

Assessment

Session 7

Different Backgrounds, Common Ground

Assessment and personal response

Miriam’s story PPT

Personal reflection

Each session designed to be delivered in a lesson slot of approximately an hour, though activities can be tailored to meet the needs of your students.

Geography National Curriculum KS3

The following from the curriculum is covered:

Purpose of study

“A high-quality geography education should inspire in pupils a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. Teaching should equip pupils with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes.”

Aims

Students:

  • develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places including their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes

Please allow 10 minutes at the end of the session for students to complete the Student Survey. Please collect the surveys at the end and submit them to the MHMT. If you are participating in our Evaluation & Impact Study this is vital. Thank you.

Different Backgrounds, Common Ground

Session 1: Introduction and locating Odisha

Geography
Geography
Focus: 
  • Introduction to Miriam Hyman and the Miriam’s Vision resource
  • Locating India / Odisha on a map
Key Message: 

Miriam’s Vision: A Response to the 2005 London Bombings is the Hyman family’s way of trying to help you to create a safer, more inclusive society in response to what happened to Miriam.

Objectives: 
  • To make links between Miriam, her story and the location of Odisha
  • To locate India and Odisha on a map
  • To learn about the developmental issues that India has
Outcomes: 
  • Students will understand the wider purpose of their study with respect to the key message above
  • Students will be able to locate Asia, India and Odisha
  • Students will create a fact file about Odisha
Resources: 
Links to National Curriculum: 

In this session, students use maps to locate India within Asia and locate and find out about the region of Odisha using the activity and suggested resources.

Plan: 

Starter

  • MV Resource 0 Info for Students.pdf is a single page summary of Miriam's Vision and its aims. Print and distribute a copy to each student.

  • Show Miriam's Story videos 1 to 4 of 4 (unless you have preceded the Geography module with any of the other Miriam’s Vision modules in which case just play video 4 to remind students about the Miriam Hyman Children’s Eye Care Centre and to introduce Odisha as the focus of your Geographical enquiry).
  • Now show Geography resource 1.1 Intro Powerpoint to recap the key points of Miriam’s Story and to introduce the linked focus of your Geographical enquiry.

Activity

  • For your own reference you can access detailed official background information in MV Geography Resource 1.0 Background info for teachers Economic Survey 2014-15
  • Explain that in groups, students are going to explore the region of Odisha in India to create a fact file.  You may want to differentiate by format (visual display, electronic presentation, or even a short film) about the region, its physical features, natural resources, economic activity, people and culture.
  • Split students into mixed ability groups and provide them with printed copies of MV Geography resource 1.2 Odisha maps (1 per group) and MV Geography Resource 1.3 Caste stats (1 per group) and access to the internet and any secondary resources available.
  • N.B. As the name of the state was only changed in 2012 many online references use the previous name so students may need to use ‘Orissa’ rather than ‘Odisha’ as their search term

 

Suggested websites for student research:

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/india/orissa

http://www.mapsofindia.com/orissa/

http://www.orissa-tourism.com/

http://www.odisha.gov.in/

Plenary

Share group fact files in a class discussion.

  • What did they find out?
  • Was there anything particularly interesting, surprising or inspiring?
  • End by referring to the theme, Different Backgrounds, Common Ground. Consider similarities and differences between Odisha and your own region.

Homework

List the physical and human geographical similarities and differences between Odisha and your region in a table.  Examples: Both are populated; the sizes of the population are different.  Both have industries; the types of industry may have similarities and differences.

Session 2: Understanding the development issues facing Odisha

Geography
Geography
Focus: 
  • Different Backgrounds, Common Ground
  • Understanding the development issues that Odisha faces
Key Message: 

Different Backgrounds, Common Ground: We all want the same things! (To feel safe, live comfortably, to support ourselves and our families and protect our loved ones.) Where we live and our access to resources ultimately affect how we achieve these.

Objectives: 
  • To understand ways in which a country’s development can be measured
  • To appreciate that with development comes change – not always perceived as positive
Outcomes: 
  • Students will understand ways in which regions (eg countries) can be compared
  • Students will identify key development factors for Odisha
Resources: 
  • IWB with internet
Links to National Curriculum: 

Analyse and interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS).

Communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, including through maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length.

Plan: 

Starter

  • Introduce the concept of measuring the development of countries to students as a form of statistical comparison.
  • “Development” is a measure of how economically, socially, culturally or technologically advanced a region (eg a country) is. The two main ways of measuring development are economic development and human development.
  • Economic development includes a country's wealth and how it is generated; and human development incorporates wealth, jobs, education, nutrition, health, leisure and safety - as well as political and cultural freedom.
  • Two other terms commonly used to compare countries are Standard of living (material elements, such as wealth and nutrition) and quality of life (health and leisure).
  • There is no one way to calculate the level of development because country’s economies, cultures and people are so different, so geographers use a series of criteria known as development indicators, for example:
  • Health: Does the population have access to medical care? What level of healthcare is available - basic or advanced? Is it free?
  • Industry: What type of industry dominates? LEDCs focus on primary industries, such as farming, fishing and mining. MEDCs focus on secondary industries, such as manufacturing. The most advanced countries tend to focus more on tertiary or service industries, such as banking and information technology.
  • Education: Does the population have access to education? Is it free? What level of education is available (i.e. primary, secondary or further/higher education)?

Activity 1

  • Explain that the United Nations Human Development Index (HDI) is a weighted mix of indices that show life expectancy, knowledge (adult literacy and education) and standard of living (GDP per capita), which provides each country with an HDI value ranging from 0 to 1. According to the 2013 HDI, the UK has an index of 0.892 and India 0.586
  • Before showing the following United Nations Development Plan HDI to students, ask them which three countries they’d expect to be at the top of the list.  Now show the link: http://hdr.undp.org/en/content/table-1-human-development-index-and-its-components.  Were they right?  Are there any surprises?  Are they surprised by the top three?  What do they make of the UK’s ranking (14th)?
  • Display MV Geography Resource 2.1 Venn diagram slide on the IWB and using what students have learned about Odisha so far, brainstorm possible development indicators for each category.
  • In mixed ability groups, using MV Geography Resource 2.2.1 Orissa Development Indicators, MV Geography Resource 2.2.2 GDP Odisha Sudan and MV Geography Resource 2.2.3 Literacy rates Orissa students compare the information provided for Odisha and India, considering:
    • How representative is Odisha’s HDI of India as a nation?
    • How reliable is this data?
  • Discuss student findings.  Explain that the problem with these statistics is that they can be misleading, because the indices used are often a collective generalisation of many different indicators, which may differ from country to country, are not always easy to collect or keep up to date. They also tend to represent the average for the whole country, so do not reflect the extremes and or variations in particular regions

Activity 2

  • Split students into mixed ability groups
  • Hand out printed copies of MV Geography Resource 2.3 Sectors of industry information card (1 per group)
  • Project MV Geography Resource 2.4 Odisha's industries slide
  • Students sort industries into Primary, Secondary and Tertiary as defined by their information cards.
  • Discuss how the balance between industry sectors changes as a country develops using students’ understanding of the UK as a comparison

Plenary

  • Recap on key learnings from session
  • Consider other ways in which regions and countries can be categorised and compared (e.g. their size, population)
  • Introduce the homework as below
    • Discuss how to scale the graph and plot the countries

Homework

  • Hand out worksheets MV Geography Resource 2.5.1 HDI worksheet and / or MV Geography Resource 2.5.2 HDI worksheet extension. They are differentiated by ability. Plot a development graph showing the comparative development trends of the following four countries:
  • UK (Very high human development)
  • China (High human development)
  • India (Medium human development)
  • Central African Republic (Low human development
  • Write a sentence (or longer for more able students) to explain the information shown by your graph.

Session 3: Conflicting interests and use of natural resources

Geography
Geography
Focus: 
  • Conflicting interests and use of natural resources
  • Understanding causes and impacts of the mining conflict in Odisha
Key Message: 
  • Different Backgrounds, Common Ground
  • Poverty reduces choice, and conflict over resources often creates imbalance for both people and environment. ‘Never judge someone else until you’ve walked a mile in their shoes’.
Objectives: 
  • To understand the reasons why companies mine in regions like Odisha
  • To understand that landscape is defined by physical and human geography and can change over time
Outcomes: 
  • Students will find out why Odisha is geographically suitable for mining
  • Students will explore the impact of mining in Odisha
  • Students will examine this impact from the perspectives of different interested parties
Resources: 
  • IWB with YouTube access
  • A3 paper
Links to National Curriculum: 

Students will begin to understand some of the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time.

Plan: 

Starter

  • Odisha as a region is rich in natural resources. Project Slide 3 of MV Geography Resource 1.2 Odisha maps on IWB and zoom in to explore mineral locations across Odisha
  • Watch the documentary “Mining and Environment Odisha” on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJ_BCFvUW7w which details the process and impact of mining different minerals in Odisha.
  • The full documentary is over 40 minutes.  Recommend watching the initial introduction (2 minutes), documentary intro (1 minute), development (1 minute), introduction to rest of documentary (1.5 minutes).  Ask the class who has produced this documentary and why.  (An organisation called the Society of Geoscientists and Allied Technologists whose members include mining companies; its agenda is to promote mineral development activities in India.)  In what ways does the documentary reflect the agenda of SGAT?  (It acknowledges the negative impacts of mining on the environment and communities, and puts an emphasis on the need to continue mining while mitigating its negative impacts.)
  • After 6.47min some of the important minerals of Odisha are individually examined; their uses, extraction processes, impacts and mitigating activities.  Focus on one (the first is Bauxite, which ends at 11.27min) and discuss / record its uses and the environmental impacts of its extraction, and any steps that are being taken to counteract negative impacts.  From 6.47min to 30.30min nine minerals are covered: Bauxite, mineral sands (at 11.27min), chromite (at 14min), iron ore (at 15.30mins), coal (at 27.30mins), (at 28.45mins there are contributions from two villagers who explain the effects of pollution on their lives and the rest of this short section summarises some of the major impacts of mining activities), limestone and dolomite (at 30mins), granite (at 32.30mins).
  • You may also want to show the section on responsible mine decommissioning (at 37.40mins) and the conclusion (at 39mins) which talks about developments over the last fifty years in practices, legislation and attitudes

Suggested mining websites for further information:

Activity 1

  • Split students into 6 mixed ability groups and provide each group with a printed copy of MV Geography Resource 1.2 Odisha maps, Slides 3 and 5. Based on what they have learned about mining and its impacts, students brainstorm a list of physical impacts for each mined area by annotating MV Geography Resource 1.2 Odisha maps, Slides 5.

Activity 2

  • Each group gets one of the six different accounts from MV Geography Resource 3.1 A Day in the Life Of.  Each group gets one account glued in the centre of an A3 sheet
  • Students consider the impact on the individual and locality portrayed in their story and use sketches and captions to record these on their A3 sheet
  • Impact could be split into human and physical.

Plenary

  • Feedback physical impacts recorded then share group ‘Day in the Life Of’ stories
  • Project http://omcltd.in/web/Portals/0/OMC%20Advt.2013-14.pdf the Odisha Mining Corporation’s Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) flyer. 
  • What is the company’s perception of how they help society?
  • How are the mining company’s perspectives similar of different to those in the “Day in the Life Of” activity?  You may wish to go through each one individually.
  • Bring the conversation back to the concept of different backgrounds and perceptions.  The different “interested parties” have different needs and want different outcomes.

Homework

  • Research definitions for “discernment” and “compromise”.
  • Highlight all the physical impacts of mining in Odisha stated in the news article MV Geography resource 3.2 Odisha’s story about Pollution, Mining and the Environment
  • This will be used in the next session

Session 4: Environmental issues facing agrarian societies

Geography
Geography
Focus: 
  • Different Backgrounds, Common Ground
  • Environmental issues facing agrarian societies
Key Message: 
  • Planet Earth is a finite resource and human actions and processes ultimately have consequences, some of which are irreversible.
  • The ability to listen to others, understanding someone else’s perspective, compromise and patience are key to resolving conflict.
Objectives: 
  • To understand that industry is important for developing countries. The consequences of industrialisation can be categorised as economic, social and environmental.
  • To understand the impact of human actions and processes.
Outcomes: 
  • Students will be able to identify the impacts of mining in Odisha as economic, social or environmental
  • Students will explore the impact of the changing landscape on the Adivasi people’s cultural, social and economic wellbeing
Links to National Curriculum: 

Students will begin to understand how human and physical processes interact to influence and change landscapes, environments and the climate; and how human activity relies on effective functioning of natural systems.

Plan: 

Starter

  • Project MV Geography Resource 3.2 Odisha's Story about Pollution, Mining and the Environment. Students feed back and discuss their homework findings as a whole class.
  • Impacts can be categorised into social, economic and environmental.  Elicit / provide examples from the article for each.
  • Review the homework task and discuss the definitions of “discernment” and “compromise”.

Activity 1

  • Split students into mixed ability groups
  • Hand out printed copies of MV Geography Resource 4.1 Impacts of mining card sort (1 copy per group, prepared by cutting into individual cards and separate headings).  Depending on your group you may choose to use a smaller selection of the cards.
  • Students read and sort each card according to whether the impact given is social, economic or environmental.
  • Feed back to the class with a few examples.

Activity 2

  • Students use the prompts in MV Geography Resource 4.2 Dongria Khond tribe and key vocabulary on MV Geography Resource 4.3 Word mat (projected or printed out) to write a geographical report on the mining conflict in Odisha.
  • According to ability, the report should contain:
    • Introduction
    • Main argument. Issues should be organised by importance and supported by facts where available. Causes and consequences of the problem should be described
    • Use of tables / graphs
    • Conclusion

Plenary

  • Share responses to card sort and discuss any discrepancies
  • Ask students whether they think the impacts of the changing landscape on the Advasi people’s cultural, social and economic well-being are all negative?  Why?

Homework

  • The next session explores the wider issues of environmental impact and conflicting interests using a case study of the film Avatar.
  • Watch / find out about the story of the film Avatar and make notes: “What should we consider when making decisions when there are conflicting interests?” Students could be encouraged to use school computer facilities if they are unable to access internet at home.

Session 5: Environmental issues facing agrarian society

Geography
Geography
Focus: 
  • Different Backgrounds, Common Ground
  • Environmental issues facing agrarian society
Key Message: 
  • Fiction can reflect reality but there may not always be a happy ending.
Objectives: 
  • To understand landscape is defined by physical and human geography and can change over time
  • To consider what decisions should be made when faced with conflicting interests
Outcomes: 
  • Students will compare real environmental destruction and human displacement with a fictional view
  • Students will consider what decisions should be made when faced with conflicting interests
  • Students will create visualisations of human impacts on physical landscapes
Resources: 
  • A3 paper for recording similarities and differences (1 per group)
Links to National Curriculum: 

Students will begin to understand how human and physical processes interact to influence and change landscapes, environments and the climate; and how human activity relies on effective functioning of natural systems.

Plan: 

Starter

  • Feed back from homework task: Summarise Avatar film key points. Collate responses to the question: “What should we consider when making decisions when there are conflicting interests?” (e.g. different viewpoints, consequences and needs)
  • Watch http://www.survivalinternational.org/films/mine up to 10:57

Activity

  • Split the class into groups and provide each with the overview of either Pandora or Odisha from MV Geography resource 5.1 Niyamgiri v Avatar
  • Working in groups students compare the real life story of Odisha with the fictional story of Pandora from the film Avatar, to organise and sort the information provided to collate similarities and differences
  • Set a time for this work to aid speed comprehension
  • Students use the information and conclusions drawn to explain their reasoning for either agreeing or disagreeing with the statement: “The Avatar film could have been based on the mining conflict of Odisha.”

Plenary

  • Feed back and discuss group responses to the Avatar comparison activity.
  • Remind students of the real life impacts of mining explored last session.  Project MV Geography Resource 3.2 Odisha's Story about Pollution, Mining and the Environment. Debate whether or not the cinematic concept “they all lived happily ever after” is achievable in the real world?
  • Do students have anything else to add to their responses to the question, “What should we consider when making decisions when there are conflicting interests?”

Homework

  • Find an image of a landscape / cityscape online or from a magazine and stick it onto an A4 sheet of paper then label or annotate the human and physical features within it (label = one word, annotate = a sentence).
  • Extension: Consider how the image might change over time – use your annotations to show how something that is human geography (mining) causes something that is physical geography to change (hillside to pit).

Session 6: Conflict resolution: What should we consider when making decisions when there are conflicting interests?

Geography
Geography
Focus: 
  • Different Backgrounds, Common Ground
  • Conflict resolution: “What should we consider when making decisions when there are conflicting interests?”
Key Message: 
  • Different Backgrounds, Common Ground - Extremists v mainstream society
  • To understand the causes of conflict and appreciate how human activity relies on the resolution of conflict through compromise and regulation. The ability to listen to others in an attempt to understand someone else’s perspective, compromise and patience are key to resolving conflict.
Objectives: 
  • To consider what decisions are being made when faced with conflicting interests
  • To investigate effective methods of conflict resolution
Outcomes: 
  • Students will evaluate real issues, considering actions that are likely to be effective
  • Students will demonstrate their understanding of the geographical outcomes of this module through a formal assessment
Links to National Curriculum: 

To develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places including their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes. 

Plan: 

Starter

  • Recap key points from previous session. Remind students of the mining conflict in Odisha.
  • Split the class into 6 mixed ability groups.  Project Slide 1 of MV Geography Resource 6.1 Stakeholder roles.  Give each group a print-out of one stakeholder role on Slides 2 to 7 for role play debate and pose the statement (framed as a questions) on Slide 8: “The mining in Odisha should go ahead” Depending on your group, individuals or whole groups could defend their positions.
  • After the debate, have a vote with a show of hands.  You could ask the students to vote first in role and then from their personal perspective.

Activity 1

  • Students prepare to take on the role of their stakeholder to argue either for or against the mining in Niyamgiri.
  • After student groups have presented their argument, they brainstorm ways in which each stakeholder could compromise.
  • Display MV Geography resource 6.2 Opinion spectrum and encourage students to stand along the line. They could answer in role and later give their own personal opinion.
  • Consider using the snowballing technique here.  In working pairs, students have a few minutes to discuss their response, note ideas on paper if appropriate, and agree a response. Each pair then joins up with another pair and these groups of four discuss their response to the same questions.  Compromise on a group response.  Point out that this method of “voting” can allow for compromise and group decisions.  Depending on time and number of students, this could be repeated again until the whole group compromises with a group response.

Activity 2

Plenary

  • Elicit and discuss student response
  • Share and discuss MV Geography resource 6.5 Alternative solutions
  • Introduce formal assessment for homework

Homework

  • Students complete a written assignment in response to the question “To what extent should the mining in Odisha be allowed to go ahead?”  Use the assessment criteria in MV Geography resource 6.6 Assessment guide.
  • You can also ask the students to think of a local (school or community) issue where there are conflicting interests in preparation for the next session.

Session 7: The way forward: What should we consider when making decisions when there are conflicting interests?

Geography
Geography
Focus: 
  • Different Backgrounds, Common Ground
  • The way forward: “What should we consider when making decisions when there are conflicting interests?”
Key Message: 
  • Whenever any organisation has to make a decision, there will be some who agree and others who disagree. The ability to listen to others in an attempt to understand someone else’s perspective, compromise and patience are all key to resolving conflict.
  • Having explored the example of the mining conflict in Odisha, learning is now applied to issues of interest which are local, eg London based (www.london.gov.uk/london-curriculum), and connections are made between this and personal, local, national and global matters.
Objectives: 
  • Students will consider why there are different views about a local issue
  • Students will creatively apply their prior learning to their chosen issue
  • Students will relate the content of the module to the aims of the Miriam’s Vision resource
Outcomes: 
  • Students will evaluate real issues, considering actions that are likely to be effective
  • Students will extrapolate from Miriam’s story to a local situation in the UK.
Links to National Curriculum: 

A high-quality geography education should inspire in pupils a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. Teaching should equip pupils with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes.

Plan: 

Starter

  • Ask students to brainstorm the ‘physical’ and ‘human’ similarities and differences between Odisha and in London.  You could scribe this in a table on the board.
  • Now ask students to select a local issue where there are conflicting interests or potential conflicting interests (e.g. use of community spaces, access to land)

Activity 1

  • Share MV Geography resource 7.1 Link to Miriam's Story
  • Elicit local issues considered by the group.  Vote on one to focus on.
  • In mixed ability groups, students explore, research and debate in the roles of different interested parties in their chosen local issue, demonstrating their understanding of the potential impacts (physical and human) of decisions made, and possible conflict resolution methods that could be employed.
  • Students can use these points, reproduced in MV Geography Resource 7.2 Structure your debate to help structure a debate:
    • Research carefully to find appropriate information
    • Organize points by order of importance
    • Consider all sides, but make your own position clear by backing it up with convincing facts
    • Tell about the causes and consequences 
    • Use statistics for supporting your facts
    • Use clear language 
    • Use visuals (photos, graphs, diagrams) to help the audience understand your position

Plenary

  • Reflect on the key message of Miriam’s Vision resource: Miriam’s Vision: A Response to the 2005 London Bombings is the Hyman family’s way of trying to help YOU to create a safer, more inclusive society in response to what happened to Miriam.
  • Reiterate that the aims of this module are to help us to understand that there are conflicts between groups in any society.  In order to reach the best compromise for all interested parties, patient negotiation is usually necessary. 
  • Students can share personal experiences or knowledge of issues that have split groups (which could include families) or communities.  How were the issues tackled?  Were they resolved?  Could they have been better resolved?  How?  This provides opportunities for students to relate the contents of this module to themselves and their own lives.  Sharing in (non-friendship) pairs can sometimes have surprisingly rewarding personal outcomes, and as a whole class students may inspire each other.
  • Refer to the subtitle of the module, Different Backgrounds, Common Ground, as a fitting close, and end with the following questions:
  • How can the Miriam’s Vision resources help? (By learning what happened on 7/7 and understanding its far-reaching consequences; by understanding that people have the choice to influence events in their personal, local, national and global communities constructively and non-violently; by applying lessons learned to future personal and wider situations.)
  • Has anything in this module inspired you? If so, what? How?

Please allow 10 minutes at the end of the session for students to complete the Student Survey. Please collect the surveys at the end and submit them to the MHMT. If you are participating in our Evaluation & Impact Study this is vital. Thank you.

Session 1: What happened on 7th July, 2005 (“7/7”)?

History
Key Message: 

7/7On 7th July, 2005 four suicide bombers coordinated attacks on the London transport system. 52 people were killed and estimated 700 injured. was a significant event with a heavy loss of life and widespread injuries.  It was the first time that British citizens targeted their compatriots on their own soil without warning and completely randomly.  Those killed were people like you and me.  Introduce Miriam Hyman.

Objectives: 
  • Students will understand what happened on 7/7On 7th July, 2005 four suicide bombers coordinated attacks on the London transport system. 52 people were killed and estimated 700 injured. and appreciate why it was catastrophic
  • Students will begin to consider the consequences of 7/7
Outcomes: 
  • Students will produce a summary of what they already know about 7/7On 7th July, 2005 four suicide bombers coordinated attacks on the London transport system. 52 people were killed and estimated 700 injured.
  • Students will find out who Miriam Hyman was
  • Students will start to record the consequences of 7/7 in their books
Resources: 
Plan: 

NB There is a lot to pack into this session.  You’ll need to keep it moving!

Starter

Do not tell the students what the session / module is about at this stage if possible, nor share the title / objectives etc.  We want to find out how much students can infer from the slides as an intriguing way into the topic.

Optional Introductory lesson on Terrorism to be uploaded.

Show MV History Resource 1.1 Presentation Slide 2: Memorial in Hyde Park.

What is it?  What is a memorial?  Who does it commemorate?  Slides 3 and 4 provide more clues if necessary.  Establish that it commemorates the victims of 7/7 but be vague.

Phase 1

Hand out blank pieces of A3 paper.  In pairs / small groups, students write ‘7/7On 7th July, 2005 four suicide bombers coordinated attacks on the London transport system. 52 people were killed and estimated 700 injured. London Bombings’ in the middle and write as much as they know around it.

Hand out copies of Resource 1.2 What happened on 7/7? and ask students to compare it with their sheet.

Plenary 1

Class discussion:  What didn’t they know?  Does the summary sheet miss out anything important?  This is the point at which to ensure that they have a reasonable understanding of what happened.

To back up the summary sheet and subsequent discussion, you can choose a number of options to show at this stage selected from Resource 1.2 Presentation, Slides 5-12:

Images relating to 7/7

BBC map / timeline

News clips

Short documentary

Phase 2

Focus on those who were killed on 7/7.  Fifty-two died (plus the four bombers).  Use the BBC or Guardian links on Slide 13 to display the photographs of the victims.  This is an interactive page so if the students have access to computers in the session they could find out more about some of the victims themselves, or you could this as a class using the IWB.  Note that the victims were generally young (in their twenties and thirties) and on their way to work, which is, of course, why the bombers chose that time – in order to maximise loss of life, injury, terror and commercial losses through the disruption of commercial life.

Find Miriam Hyman (on the number 30 Bus, Tavistock Square) amongst the victims and explain that Miriam’s story will form an important part of the module. 

Play video Miriam’s Story Part 1: Who was Miriam Hyman?

Play video Miriam’s Story part 2: What happened to Miriam on 7th July 2005?

(Each clip is 2 minutes.)

Brief discussion: Why was Miriam on the bus?  Where had she been going?  What do we know about Miriam – her life, the things she liked, her talents, her strong family ties and firm friendships, her art work and her values, such as inclusiveness?  Explain that we will return to Miriam in future sessions. 

[There are inaccuracies in most, if not all reportage, from Miriam’s age to her job and so on.  In discussing what we know about Miriam from the media you may wish to bring up the reliability of sources.]

Plenary 2: Conclusion

Reveal the main enquiry question: What happened after the 2005 London bombings?  Hold a brief discussion about the meaning of “consequences”.  Based on today’s session, what were the consequences of 7/7?  Each pupil will need a place to record consequences at the end of each session; the back of their books might be a good place or on a clean double page at the front.

Try to end the session by emphasising the fact that innocent people like them died that day, to emphasise why this matters.  There is a powerful clip via YouTube (Slide 13) that shows pictures of the fifty-two victims in turn in silence.  This is towards the end of an ITV new clip about the one year anniversary of the bombings.  Fast forward to 5.38 minutes.  It’s a bit fuzzy but very poignant and ends with Miriam.  Check how it looks on your board before showing it!  It lasts about one minute.

Homework?

If you feel it is appropriate, students could ask parents / relatives / neighbours what they remember about 7/7 (note-taking optional).

Session 2: Personal consequences (1): who was affected by 7/7?

History
History
Key Message: 

There was a wide range of people involved in the bombings beyond the 52 victims – the injured, eye-witnesses, doctors, police etc – and each was profoundly affected by the experience.

Objectives: 
  • Students will explore the diverse range of people involved in 7/7On 7th July, 2005 four suicide bombers coordinated attacks on the London transport system. 52 people were killed and estimated 700 injured.
  • Students will extract relevant information from a wide range of source material
  • Students will consider the usefulness of eye-witness accounts
Outcomes: 
  • Students will complete a summary sheet about those involved in 7/7On 7th July, 2005 four suicide bombers coordinated attacks on the London transport system. 52 people were killed and estimated 700 injured. and use this to expand their list of consequences
  • Students will participate in small group and whole group discussions about what they have learned
Plan: 

Starter

If students asked friends and family about 7/7On 7th July, 2005 four suicide bombers coordinated attacks on the London transport system. 52 people were killed and estimated 700 injured. for homework, this is the time to share that – in small groups and/or whole class.  They might be able to record further consequences in their book at this stage.  Even if this task was not completed, certainly remind them of the overall enquiry question and recap on previous lesson.  Emphasise that 52 (+4 bombers) died that day and over 700 were injured (probably a conservative estimate) and an unknown number of people connected to those killed and injured have experienced unrecorded effects.  Slide 2 shows one of the iconic images of the day – a woman with her face badly burned and covered – and how she looks today.

Phase 1

The specific focus for this lesson is to consider who was affected by 7/7 on the actual day other than the 52 victims themselves.  Play the film of [qtip:Dr Buckman|Dr Laurence Buckman is a leading British GP. He was at a meeting at BMA House on Tavistock Square when the bus exploded on 7/7On 7th July, 2005 four suicide bombers coordinated attacks on the London transport system. 52 people were killed and estimated 700 injured. and attended the wounded all day.] (who helped those injured on the number 30 bus) which lasts for 15 minutes.  During film, students begin to fill in summary sheet, focusing on:

  1. Who was involved 7/7 and how
  2. How 7/7 is described

Plenary 1

Discussion of the film.  It is worth discussing two aspects not included on the sheet:

  1. the coincidences that day (bus diverted so the bomb went off outside the BMA on a day when it was unusually full of doctors at meetings; medical director of Lincs air ambulance and an expert in disaster management was there;  policeman turning up with an armful of drip bags just as they were running out – he saved lives).
  2. What he has to say about whether this is ‘all about Muslims’.  (No – several of those who died were Muslims – this isn’t about Muslims, it is about murderers).   NB –more knowledge you can add at this point - note that three out of the four bombers had criminal records which is fairly typical.  Bombers/would-be bombers often tend to be ‘misfits’ – loners, unhappy in their personal lives.

Phase 2

Discuss how useful is Dr BuckmanDr Laurence Buckman is a leading British GP. He was at a meeting at BMA House on Tavistock Square when the bus exploded on 7/7 and attended the wounded all day.’s account in understanding what happened on 7/7?  Useful because he was at the scene of the Tavistock bombing within minutes, he saw the direct consequences of the bomb first-hand, he experienced the chaos etc, he has no reasons not to report it as fully as he can.  Limited because the Tavistock bombing was one of four, he was very absorbed in treating his patient, he was experiencing it as a doctor rather than someone who was injured/an eye witness etc so this is one perspective.

What other accounts might be useful for comparison and to find out more?

Students use information packs to find out more about who was affected and how 7/7 has been described and record on their summary sheet.  Note that at this stage I have included a lot of information that can go in the packs.  You will need to select and cut as appropriate to the class.

Plenary 2 (conclusion)

Whole class discussion about who was involved – possibly one pair/small group identifies type of person affected (eg chefs in a hotel) and another pair/small group has to explain how they were involved (provided improvised equipment eg tabletops as stretchers, talked to the injured to keep them going, looked after the ‘walking wounded’).

How has 7/7 been described?  Which phrases were most commonly used?  Which were most poignant?

Students to record personal consequences of 7/7 in their books as per previous lesson.

Homework?

Students to google Gill Hicks or Martine Wright.  Find out what happened to them on 7/7On 7th July, 2005 four suicide bombers coordinated attacks on the London transport system. 52 people were killed and estimated 700 injured. and what they have done since.

Session 3: Personal consequences (2): Can negative events have positive consequences?

History
History
Key Message: 

Despite the events of 7/7, some people have been able to respond positively including Miriam Hyman’s family.

Objectives: 
  • Students will investigate a range of positive responses to 7/7 amongst the bereaved and survivors
  • Students will consider long-term consequences of 7/7 for the first time
  • Students will collate and analyse information in order to summarise how one family has responded to 7/7
Outcomes: 
  • Students will add to their list of consequences
  • Students will write a paragraph summarising the response of the Hyman family
Resources: 
Plan: 

Starter

Project MV History Resource 3.1 Presentation.pptx. If students completed the research homework, what did they find out about Gill Hicks or Martine Wright?  What happened to them on 7/7? (lost both legs), how have they responded? (working for peace; participating in the 2012 Paralympics).  How could they have responded? (bitter, angry, afraid, reclusive etc.)   NB If students were not set this as homework, show film about Martine Wright (link on Slide 2) as an example of severely injured victims rebuilding their lives positively.

Phase 1

Focus on those who lost friends and family.  They have also had to try to rebuild their lives.  Start with film on Guardian website (Slide 3 – ‘6 Years On’) which interviews four people – three of whom lost family members (including Esther Hyman talking about her sister, Miriam) and one who was injured and survived.  You will need to explain that the film was made in 2011 after the official inquest into those who died (and explain that an inquest is an enquiry into the cause of death).

During the film (it lasts about 14 minutes), ask students to note:

  1. What happened in the days immediately after the bombings?
  2. Do they blame anyone for what happened? 
  3. What sorts of positive things have happened as a result of 7/7?

Discuss.  You might want to explore the concept of ‘blame’ – how helpful is it?

Phase 2

Students to answer the question ‘How has the Hyman family responded to the events of 7/7?’ using a variety of sources. 

First, play Miriam’s Story videos Parts 3 and 4. (You might want to recap briefly on what we know about Miriam from the first two parts of her story in lesson 1.) This provides more detail about the Miriam Hyman Children’s Eye Care Centre in Odisha mentioned on the Guardian film. 

Second, let them explore the website of the Miriam Hyman Memorial Trust (MHMT – Slide 4) or if internet access is not available to all students, show them the website via a projector/IWB and have copies of key pages from the site to show what the Trust does and how the family has responded to their loss (especially the eye care centre, fund raising and the letter from Miriam’s family for the Book of Tributes).

Third, explain that this module is part of the Trust’s education programme to encourage a greater understanding of how to live together harmoniously and to respond to challenges in a positive way.

Fourth, publication of Miriam’s artwork (Slide 5).  Her use of colour, form, imagination and interpretation brings joy and inspiration to many.  It is her direct legacy.

Students to write a paragraph answering the question.

Plenary 2 (conclusion)

A few students to read out their paragraphs.  Class discussion – what are their thoughts about the response of the Hyman family to their loss?  How else could the family have responded?  Why do you think they have made these choices? 

Can the students offer other examples of positive and constructive responses to challenges, either personal or beyond their own experiences?

Finish by adding more consequence to their list.

Extension (homework?)

Students browse the Miriam Hyman Memorial Trust website.  They research and make a list of organisations that have been set up

  • as a consequence of 7/7
  • as a consequence of other terror attacks
  • as a consequence of other negative events

Session 4: What were the wider, less personal consequences of 7/7?

History
History
Key Message: 

A number of specific things have changed as a result of 7/7 regarding, for example,  emergency procedures and the work of MI5.

Objectives: 
  • Students will understand that 7/7 also led to wider, less personal consequences than in previous lessons
  • Students will analyse and speculate who/what was held respondible for the 52 deaths on 7/7
  • Students will extract information from source material and compare one source with another
Outcomes: 
  • Students will discuss who/what was held responsible based on their previous lessons and own knowledge
  • Students will expand their list of consequences
Plan: 

Starter

Who or what could be held responsible for the fifty-two fatalities on 7/7?

Based on previous sessions, how much have students gleaned about who or what was held responsible? Try to draw out their thinking here by redirecting them to previous work or encourage speculation.

  • Were the four bombers responsible? (Remember Dr Buckman who described them simply as murderers, regardless of their motivation.)
  • Was the religion of Islam responsible? (See Slide 2 – but the backlash soon died down.  Generally people have understood that extremists are not representative of ordinary Muslims and that the Koran does not condone their behaviour.)
  • Were the emergency services held responsible (for being too slow)?& Was MI5 responsible for not preventing 7/7 in the first place? It is unlikely that they will have picked up criticisms of MI5 from previous sessions.  The main criticism related to the poor quality of a photograph used by MI5 which may have prevented identification of one of the bombers by an informant.  The BBC link on Slide 3 enables you to show exactly the problem with the photo.  Scroll to the bottom of the webpage and you can look at the original and then the cropped version of the same photograph.
  • Anyone else?

Phase 1: The Inquest

Hand out copies of MV History Resource 4.1 Coroner's verdict.  What did Lady Justice Hallett conclude about who should be held responsible? (Unlawful killings by terrorist action.  The evidence didn’t justify the conclusion that any failings of any organisation or individual caused or contributed to the deaths.)

Hand out copies of MV History Resource 4.2 Families' recommendations, made prior to the Inquest.  In groups of three, each student reads one section of the recommendations.

Hand out MV History Resource 4.3 Coroner's recommendations made at the Inquest.  How far do they cover similar ground to the recommendations put forward by the families?  (This is really a way to motivate students to read them carefully).

Plenary 1

Establish that all the recommendations made by the Coroner at the inquest were accepted in full.

How satisfied do students think the families might have been?  Think back to the Guardian film of four people being interviewed in the last session.  They were satisfied on the whole and glad to know as much information as possible.   Although some wanted a further public enquiry, others felt this was a waste of public money.  (For more on this, see MV History Resource 4.4 Presentation Slide 4).

Phase 2

What were the wider, less personal consequences of 7/7?  Which recommendations are already being implemented?

Play MV History Resource 4.5 Dr Buckman Q&A.  Skip to 14.06 minutes in (to the student asking what changes 7/7 has led to).  Students to note in exercise books the changes Dr Buckman mentions and then refer back to MV History Resource 4.3 Coroner's recommendations to cross-reference.  Have some of the recommendations already been implemented?

(NB other recommendations have been implemented too and this is an ongoing process.  One change that Dr Buckman does not mention is the London Ambulance Service’s change in triage procedures in these types of circumstances.  Triage is assessment of the severity of an injury to decide how urgently treatment is needed.  Note that this change was a direct result of Miriam’s and Philip Duckworth’s experiences.)

Plenary 2 (conclusion)

Students to add to the consequences list in their exercise books.

Session 5: Analysing the consequences of 7/7

History
History
Key Message: 

The consequences of 7/7 were (and continue to be) diverse and complex.  The job of the historian is to analyse what we know in order to make some tentative judgements.

Objectives: 
  • Students will analyse and categorise different types of consequences
  • Students will make judgements about the relevance of a consequence for answering different questions
  • Students will distinguish between big points (headings) and little points (supporting details)
Outcomes: 
  • Students will sort the cards in different ways and record their decisions
  • Students will select and possibly begin their final task for the enquiry
Resources: 
  • The students’ consequences lists
  • MV History Resource 5.1 Consequence cards printed on A4 card.  You may prefer to have students write out their own cards on the blank sheet provided based on the consequences they have been recording during the enquiry.  If you wish to use them, the cards here are meant as a starting point.
  • Summary of consequences cards
  • Final task choices
Plan: 

Starter

Return to the enquiry question. 

Phase 1

Hand out packs of consequence cards to pairs of students.  The packs include some blank cards.  Students read each card and decide if it covers any of the consequences on their list.  If it doesn’t they need to mark this on their list.  The blank cards are for consequences on their lists that are not on the starter cards.

Plenary 1

Pairs join with other pairs to compare their extra cards.  Do they wish to add new ones at this stage?

Phase 2

Students work in small groups to devise different ways to categorise and sort the cards.  How much guidance you provide here will depend on the group.  You may want the students to come up with their own categories, but the cards could be organised according to, for example:

  • Negative / positive consequences
  • Long-term / short-term consequences
  • Personal / impersonal consequences
  • Direct / indirect consequences
  • Big points / little points (The big points might be headings such as ‘Changes in emergency services’, ‘Eye witnesses’ etc.)

Cards can then be physically organised in different ways, according to the different categories.  For example: On opposite corners of pieces of sugar paper, the students write one category, eg ‘Negative’ in one corner, ‘Positive’ in the other.  Students take turns at placing the cards according to how closely related they are.  Groups can exchange the sugar paper category sheets to sort the cards in different ways.

You can also try asking very specific questions and asking them to decide which cards would be relevant in the answer.  For example: ‘What happened after the 2005 London bombings?’ can include everything.  But what about ‘Did anything good come out of 7/7?’ or ‘How did 7/7 change people’s lives?’ or ‘What happened in the immediate aftermath of the London bombings?’ and so on.  This helps them to realise that information becomes more or less important depending on what is being asked.

You will need to find a way for students to record some of their sorting activities.  They should record some of the headings they identify as this will help them in their final task.  One of the resources provided is MV History Resource 5.1 Consequence cards with space for them to write down the extra cards.  Distributed as a printed sheet, it could be their reference for the final task.

Plenary 2 Ongoing

You will want to stop the students periodically to discuss how they have sorted the cards and to introduce a different way of organising them. 

Plenary 3 Conclusion / Homework

Students can choose what final task they wish to undertake for homework.  They should leave the session knowing what they are going to do and, if there is time, have done some preliminary planning.

Students may come up with their own final task, or you may wish to choose (or give them a choice) from the following:

  • An essay answering the enquiry question- What happened after the 2005 London bombings?
  • A short documentary on the consequences of 7/7, possibly to mark an anniversary.  This could draw heavily on the source material they have studied but it must include an analysis of the consequences (see mark scheme).
  • A piece of artwork and accompanying explanation which seeks to illustrate the range of consequences of 7/7.  This must include an analysis of the consequences (see mark scheme).

Mark scheme for final outcome

1-4 marks

Students understand that there were several consequences of 7/7 but these are undifferentiated (all consequences are deemed to be of the same importance and type) and not linked explicitly with the events of 7/7.  Effectively, students are writing a list of consequences with little attempt to analyse them.  Their knowledge and understanding of 7/7 and its consequences is fairly basic.  Award at the top of the band if their knowledge is accurate and they identify at least four accurate consequences of 7/7.

5-7 marks

Students begin to explain and analyse the range of consequences of 7/7, either in terms of their type (eg personal/impersonal; direct /indirect) or their importance/significance.  They are clearer about the relationship between the consequences and the events of 7/7, i.e. they explain how and why each consequence came about after the bombings.  They support their analysis with examples drawn from the enquiry and their understanding of events is sound.  Award at the top of the band if they analyse the consequences in more than two ways and reward those whose knowledge is secure and who make use of several examples to support their analysis.

8-10 marks

Students explain and analyse the range of consequences in multiple ways, including for example by time (long/short term), by type (personal/impersonal), by importance/significance and by relationship to 7/7 (direct/indirect).  There is scope to explore how it is difficult to judge the relative importance/significance of these consequences because they are all quite different – each could be deemed important in its own right.  Any answer in this band will be supported by extensive examples drawn from the enquiry and accurate and sensitive understanding of the events of 7/7 and its consequences.

Session 6: What happened after the London bombings? Can we apply Miriam’s story to our own lives?

History
History
Focus: 
This session is an opportunity to draw together the themes from the module, relate them to the students' own lives, and reiterate that Miriam's Vision is about THEM building a safer, more inclusive society, respecting fundamental rights.
Key Message: 
The Miriam's Vision History module can help students to recognise and respect their own rights and responsibilities, and those of their society.
Objectives: 
Draw together themes from the module Relate themes to students' own lives Empower students to participate in building a safer, more inclusive society, respecting fundamental rights
Outcomes: 
Students reflect on the module, their own lives, and their rights and responsibilities
Plan: 

The structure of this session is very flexible. You may wish the students to share the outcomes of the Session 5 Homework task with each other. The piloting of the module has demonstrated the fantastic response of pupils to the tasks, whichever option they select, and this is a good opportunity to share these.

Next, it would be appropriate and powerful to re-show the four-part Miriam’s Story video package before discussing what the students feel have been the most significant consequences of 7/7.

From the point of view of the goals of Miriam's Vision, it is vital that students apply their learning to their own lives. This does take the final lesson in a direction more typical of PSHE.

Focus question: Can we apply Miriam’s story to our own lives?

Return to the purpose of Miriam’s Vision. Although there have been positive outcomes to 7/7, it was a painful and avoidable event. Reiterate that Miriam’s Vision: A Response to the 2005 London Bombings is the Hyman family’s way of trying to contribute towards a safer, more inclusive society, through education.

How can this history module help to do that? MV Resource 0 Info for Students.pdf is a single page summary of Miriam's Vision and its aims. Print and distribute a copy to each student. (By learning what happened on 7/7 and understanding its far-reaching consequences, by understanding that THEY have the choice to influence consequences constructively, by applying lessons learned to future personal and wider situations, etc.)

In pairs or groups (suggest non-friendship) students share personal experiences or knowledge of negative events that have had positive consequences, or that could have had more positive consequences, and how. This provides opportunities for students to relate the contents of this module to their personal histories and their own lives. Based on our piloting, sharing can sometimes have surprisingly personal outcomes, and feeding back as a whole class, students may inspire each other. Be aware, however, of potential sensitivities amongst any children who may have experienced deep traumas in their lives.

End by discussing: Has anything inspired you during this module? What? How?

Please allow 10 minutes at the end of the session for students to complete the Student Survey. Please collect the surveys at the end and submit them to the MHMT. If you are participating in our Evaluation & Impact Study this is vital. Thank you.